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the Great Universe

The Sacherevell Riots, 1710

Interesting riot situation in which circumstances are not unlike those of present day Britain.

 

The Sacheverell riots were a series of outbreaks of public disorder, which spread across England during the spring, summer and autumn of 1710 in which supporters of the Tories attacked Dissenters’, particularlyPresbyterians’ homes and meeting-houses, whose congregations tended to support the Whigs… The Sacheverell and Rebellion riots are regarded as the most serious instances of public disorder of the eighteenth century.

The riots reflected the dissatisfaction of many Anglicans to the toleration of an increasing number ofIndependent, Baptist, and Presbyterian chapels, which diminished the apparent authority of the Church of England; and were a reaction to perceived grievances against the Whig government, in regard to high taxation resulting from the War of the Spanish Succession, the recent sudden influx of some 10,000 Calvinist refugees from Germany,[3] and the growth of the merchant classes, the so-called “monied interest”.[2]

Rioting broke out in London. On the evening of March 1, protestors attacked an elegant Presbyterian meeting-house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, built only five years before. They smashed the windows, stripped the tiles from the roof and ripped out its interior wooden fittings, which they made into a bonfire. The crowd then marauded through much of the West End of London chanting “High Church and Sacheverell” .[2]

It spread across the country, notably in Wrexham,[5] Barnstaple and Gainsborough, where Presbyterian meeting-houses were attacked, with many being burnt to the ground. The Sacheverell riots and further disturbances in 1714 and 1715, led to the passing of the Riot Act.[6]

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacheverell_riots

Henry Sacheverell and the Riot Act, 1714

Henry Sacheverell /sæˈʃɛvərəl/ (1674 – 15 June 1724) was an English High Church clergyman and politician.

Sacheverell preached his famous sermons—that the church was in danger from the neglect of the Whig ministry to keep guard over its interests—the one at Derby on 15 August 1709 entitled The Communication of Sin, the other at St Paul’s Cathedral on 5 November 1709, entitled The Perils of False Brethren, in Church, and State.

In The Perils of False Brethren, in Church, and State, the threat to the church from Catholics was dealt with in three minutes; the rest of the one-and-a-half-hour sermon was an attack on Nonconformists and the “false brethren” who aided them in menacing church and state.

Sacheverell’s trial lasted from 27 February to 21 March 1710 and the verdict was that he should be suspended for three years and that the two sermons should be burnt at the Royal Exchange. This was the decree of the state, and it had the effect of making him a martyr in the eyes of the populace and (along with heavy taxes on Londoners) bringing about the first Sacheverell riots that year in London and the rest of the country, which included attacks on Presbyterian and other Dissenter places of worship, with some being burned down. The rioting in turn led to the downfall of the government ministry later that year and the passing of the Riot Act in 1714.

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sacheverell

Decisive moments in British history: The Coronation riots, 1714

The coronation riots of October 1714 were a series of riots in southern and western England in protest against the coronation of the first Hanoverian king of Britain, George I.

On 20 October George was crowned at Westminster Abbey but when loyalists celebrated the coronation they were disrupted by rioters in over twenty towns in the south and west of England.[1] The rioters were supporters of High Church and Sacheverellite notions.[1] The Tory aristocrats and gentry absented themselves from the coronation and in some towns they arrived with their supporters to disrupt the Hanoverian proceedings.[2]

The celebrations of the coronation—balls, bonfires and drinking in taverns—were attacked by rioters who sacked their properties and assaulted the celebrants.

The general election of 1715, which was also accompanied by riots, produced a Whig majority in the House of Commons. In response to these riots, the new Whig majority passed the Riot Act to put down disturbances like these.

Eleven days after the riots, Henry Sacheverell published an open letter:

The Dissenters & their Friends have foolishly Endeavour’d to raise a Disturbance throughout the whole Kingdom by Trying in most Great Towns, on the Coronation Day to Burn Me in Effigie, to Inodiate my Person & Cause with the Populace: But if this Silly Stratagem has produc’d a quite Contrary Effect, & turn’s upon the First Authors, & aggressors, and the People have Express’d their Resentment in any Culpable way, I hope it is not to be laid to my Charge, whose Name…they make Use of as the Shibboleth of the Party.[9]

taken from  –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronation_riots

Decisive moments in British history: The Act of Settlement, 1701

The Act of Settlement is an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed in 1701[2] to settle thesuccession to the English and Irish crowns and thrones on the Electress Sophia of Hanover (a granddaughter of James VI of Scotland and I of England) and her non-Roman Catholic heirs. Her mother, Princess Elizabeth Stuart, had been born in Scotland but became famous in history asElizabeth of Bohemia.

The act was prompted by the failure of King William III and Queen Mary II, as well as of Mary’s sisterQueen Anne, to produce any surviving children, and the Roman Catholic religion of all other members of the House of Stuart. The line of Sophia of Hanover was the most junior among the Stuarts, but consisted of convinced Protestants. Sophia died on 8 June 1714, before the death of Queen Anne on 1 August 1714, at which time Sophia’s son duly became King George I and started the Hanoverian dynasty.

The act played a key role in the formation of the Kingdom of Great Britain. England and Scotland hadshared a monarch since 1603, but had remained separately governed countries. The Scottish parliament was more reluctant than the English to abandon the House of Stuart, members of which had been Scottish monarchs long before they became English ones. English pressure on Scotland to accept the Act of Settlement was one factor leading to the parliamentary union of the two countries in 1707.

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Act_of_Settlement_1701

The historic evidence for a United Kingdom

VIDEO: Venus eclipsing Nibiru

Circles of Light appear in Hounslow High Street

circles-of-light

Mysterious ‘circles of light’ appeared in Hounslow High Street earlier today amidst scenes of complete indifference by passers-by who seemed to be unaware of the presence of these strange icons that have been likened by experts to ‘crop circles composed of light’. They are seen here on a side wall of The Bell public house.

It is unsure what time the pattern first appeared although previous sightings have occurred an hour or so before dusk – the same time these exclusive photographs were taken.

With the sun setting in the background of the shots the assumption has to be they are reflections from the opposite side of the street. Another theory suggests encoded telepathic messages light-dialled on sunbeams from an advanced civilization of Venusian star-pilots currently orbiting earth as has been postulated by Ufologists.

As is society convention, we will remain open-minded to all possibilities until more data emerges wherever its origins happen to be.


circles-of-light


 

The correct way to drive in the EU

rightsideofroad

As we enter the next phase of the European experiment there are still a few unanswered questions regarding uniformity across the Union. For example, we now have bananas that are the right size and shape, and our door handles are all at the same height, but what about the more important regulations, such as acceptable driving behaviour? With vehicles coming and going from Ireland to Lithuania, switching from this side of the road to that, its about time the EU settled the argument: which side of the road should we be driving on?

Of course, the only real answer is the right side. The British drive on the right side of the car, and the left side of the road, which we shall hopefully prove is the right way. We shall also show that mainland Europeans who drive on the left-hand side of the car and the right-hand side of the road are driving the wrong way.

 

Lets look at the etymology of the word RIGHT.

right (adj.1) “morally correct,” Old English riht “just, good, fair; proper, fitting; straight, not bent, direct, erect,” from Proto-Germanic *rekhtaz (cognates: Old Frisian riucht “right,” Old Saxon reht, Middle Dutch and Dutch recht, Old High German reht, German recht, Old Norse rettr, Gothic raihts), from the (Proto-Indo-European) PIE root *reg- “move in a straight line,” also “to rule, to lead straight, to put right” cognates: Greek orektos “stretched out, upright;” Latin rectus “straight, right;” Old Persian rasta- “straight, right,” aršta- “rectitude;” Old Irish recht “law;” Welsh rhaith, Breton reiz “just, righteous, wise”).

opposite of left,” early 12c., riht, from Old English riht, which did not have this sense but meant “good, proper, fitting, straight”

In opposition to ‘left’ (Latin ‘sinister’) we find the usual PIE root (*dek-) is represented by Latin dexter. Other derivations on a similar pattern to English ‘right’ are French ‘droit’, from Latin directus “straight;” Lithuanian ‘labas’, literally “good;” and Slavic words (Bohemian pravy, Polish prawy, Russian pravyj) from Old Church Slavonic ‘pravu’, literally “straight,” from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) “forward, through”

Queen Elizabeth I

Queen Elizabeth I with the globe in her right hand.

 

‘Right’ is a homonym, a word with (multiple, but ultimately) two meanings, one being ‘opposite of left’, and the other ‘straight’ or ‘just’. If we look at how many other words in the English language contain the word ‘right’, or derivations of it, we can clearly see the fundamental meaning. For example Upright, righteous and right-minded are simple English phrases based on ‘right’, and from the Latin ‘regere’ – which meant ‘just’, ‘correct’ etc. as well as ‘to rule’ (from the PIE root ‘reg’) – we get the following English words: erect, correct, direct, rector, reign, regal, royal, regulate, register, regular, regiment and region. The same goes for nearly all the other languages in the Proto-Indo-European family, some derivative of the word ‘right’ or its root ‘reg’ means both ‘opposite of left’ and ‘to rule/correct/straight/good’. It’s almost impossible to say something is correct without using a word that has the root ‘reg’ (one only has to read back over this piece to confirm this).

 

Lets say then that right is correct. Does this mean that driving on the right side of the road is also correct? A ‘No’ would seem to contradict our theory, but we are remember only talking about where you sit in the car. We must also touch on the symbolic nature of the car, and the road it drives on, if we are to draw a satisfactory conclusion regarding the correct side of the road to drive on.

We propose that the Road is a representation of the left-handed, curved, Yin or feminine principle. Unlike the Car (whom we shall also psychoanalyse) a road is passive in the act of driving, and has no moving parts. It lays ahead, stretched wide-open waiting for us to go down it. Road workers lay roads; they are covered with Yin-like broken white lines (unless its the ‘hard shoulder’), they curve and dip, and occasionally are slick and wet, bursting at the drains from the water filling their fallopian pipework. Roundabouts and circular, motherly signs guide and advise you on your journey, pleading with you to drive safely, and only occasionally asking you to ‘give way’.

A car ‘on the other hand’ can quite easily be shown to represent the right-handed, straight-line, Yang or male principle. All moving parts, a car is built on precision engineering and has a forward-pointed aerodynamic shape. Driving a car is about speed and reaction times. They are the spear, and they are the rocket. They are the penis, hard and pointed, thrusting itself into space. Looking under the hood can be equated to pulling back the foreskin, or hood, of the penis. You can be king of the road on that wide-open highway, or you can be Lewis Hamilton in Pole position, with only your helmet visible, racing to the finish line (on a round track of course, the feminine), where, if you are the victor, you can climax champagne. In evolutionary terms, to finish first would be beneficial to the continued survival of your genes. It is an instinct-driven symbol of dominance and can be traced back in Humans tens of thousand, if not hundreds of thousands of years – although in Formula 1 they don’t make the loser eat the soggy biscuit.

Lewis Hamilton coming first

Note: The act of entering a car could be said to symbolise re-entering the womb. We feel safe inside a car, strapped in surrounded by air bags, the mirrors showing a twisted, dream-like world, weird but occasionally observable, like the pineal gland third eyes are looking out of the back of the head, passively observing the world disappearing into the distance, everything in reverse.

So, linguistically, symbolically and even genetically there seems to be a good argument to suggest that sitting on the right-hand side of the car, and on the left-hand side of the road is the correct way to drive. Nearly every language in the EU would have to agree, as these languages – going right back to the invention of PIE – agree. You sit on the right side of the car, because its right, for lots of reasons. It therefore represents the male principle, which means you drive on the left hand side of the road, because the road is the female principle. And thus we have balance.

English know how to drive

English know how to drive

Of course, this is all tongue in cheek, but there is a serious point to make. If we are to live harmoniously in the new Europe, we believe it is important to retain as much of the spirit of our ancestors, and their wisdom, as we can. The example we have chosen to highlight – as well as proving finally that the British way of driving is the correct way – serves more as an examination of ancient wisdom. Still today we have words with histories that lead to the conceptual mind of early humans, which leads to enlightenment, and which in turn gives the seeker a better understanding of the whole – the material, the abstract and the spiritual. A reformation of this ancient knowledge – that is hidden within our languages, our histories, our mythologies and our symbols – is no bad thing, it would give us all a solid ground from which to build on, and a better understanding of who we are, which is essential in understanding each other. But rather, intent on seeing through their experiment and super-imposing a multi-monoculture onto Europe, our Masters are destroying some of the oldest, richest and enlightened cultures on Earth.

The destruction of culture is the destruction of ancient wisdom, as culture is only built on ancient wisdom.

The new EU campaign

EU symbols under one symbol poster

 

Who knows, if all Europeans did adopt the natural, British style of driving, they might actually drive better? X

An Italian driver today.

An Italian driver today.

taken from –

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=right&allowed_in_frame=0

 

Crowley’s Cactus Cocktails and Curries

crowley curry

The Rites of Eleusis are a series of seven public invocations or rites written by Aleister Crowley, each centred on one of the seven classical planets of antiquity. They were performed by Crowley, his lover Leila Waddell, and Victor Neuburg in October and November, 1910, at Caxton Hall, London.

The names of the seven Rites are The Rite of “Saturn”, “Jupiter”, “Mars”, “Sol”, “Venus”, “Mercury” and “Luna”. Crowley claimed that the Rites were designed to inspire the audience with ‘religious ecstasy’, and that merely reading them would help people “cultivate their highest faculties”. Some in the popular press thought otherwise, and considered the Rites an immoral display, riddled with ‘blasphemy and erotic suggestion.’

The independent researcher Richard Spence, who has extensively researched Crowley’s links to the secret services in his book Secret Agent 666 says this, ‘The audience at the private performance were provided with a special treat, a mescaline cocktail to enhance their enjoyment. The Beast carefully observed the reactions.’

And this incident was apparently not an isolated one in Crowley’s life. His fondness for narcotics and psychedelics seems to have extended beyond the indulgent or recreational, and into a sort of early mind-control project, which would be quite useful for someone who wanted to obtain information from another individual.

From Richard Spence again, ‘Crowley once boasted “i have myself made extensive and elaborate studies of the effects of indulgence in stimulants and narcotics,” and produced “a vast quantity of unpublished data” on the subject. the Beast routinely administered mescaline or other drugs to willing and unsuspecting subjects (spicy curries were a favourite means), methodically cataloguing the results. These observations ended up in another of his journals, Liber CMXXXIV, The Cactus, which he described as an “elaborate study of the psychological effects produced by Anhalonium Lewinii… compiled from the actual records of some hundreds of experiments. The Cactus vanished after the war.’

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rites_of_Eleusis

Secret Agent 666, Richard B. Spence (2008)

Possible discovery of Alexander the Great in Greece *trolled*

alexander the great

Here is an interesting article on the discovery of an ancient skeleton in an elaborate tomb at Amphipolis in Greece.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30019338

Obviously, it would be amazing if this was the final resting place of Alexander the Great. it would be good for tourism and the boost to the country’s confidence would also be nice, but the press release tries a little too hard to NOT suggest this is the fact.

“..a skeleton inside a tomb from the time of Alexander the Great, during a dig that has enthralled the public.”

“..almost intact skeleton belonged to a “distinguished public figure”

“the tomb in all probability belongs to a male and a general”

“It is in all probability a monument to a mortal who was worshipped by his society at the time.”

“Speculation has been rife, with experts raising several possibilities including the deceased being a member of Alexander the Great of Macedon’s family or one of his most senior officials.”

“..Amphipolis was a major city of the Macedonian Kingdom… 357 BC Conquered by Philip II of Macedon, Alexander the Great’s father… Under Alexander, served as major naval base..”

The 5ociety will continue to monitor ice-cream sales in Amphipolis X

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