Society X

the Great Universe

Origin of the Ancient Horn

by 5ocietyx

In a previous post (Jinn Witches of Britain) we tried to solve a riddle regarding the origin of the 16th Century colloquial British term for a witch, Jenny Horne. It was apparently in widespread use, but particularly so in Scotland, where the name was given for the last witch to be executed in Britain.

The root of the English word ‘horn’ comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘hurnaz’, which originates from the PIE *ker, and refers to the uppermost part of the head, in most cases of an animal, and subsequently to an instrument made from this part. The Latin word for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, which presumably also shares its origin in the PIE, as the Latin for a deer is ‘cervus’ whereas the Welsh is ‘carw’. A Uni-corn is also an animal with a single horn.

One theory suggests the origin for the place name Corn-wall comes the Anglo-Saxon word for ‘the Walha (foreigners/Ancient Britons) who live on the Cern (the ‘horn’ of the land)’. Another theory is that it comes from the Cornuvii, a tribe who inhabited parts of Britain when the Romans arrived, and who worshipped the horned god Cernunos, and so took his name in veneration. The ‘Cern’ in Cernunos relays across the ages the physical character of this Celtic god – he is always shown with antlers.

The dictionary of the Scottish Language tells us that the word ‘horne’ was used in 16th century Scotland to ‘proclaim an outlaw, three blasts being blown [from a horn] by the king’s messenger… in the phrases at the horne – outlawed, and to put to the horn –  to outlaw.’

Our previous summary was that the name Jenny (for a witch) came from the same root as the words ‘Jinni’, and ‘Genie’, both of which describe ‘a spirit which is not the soul, but which lives alongside us during our life’. So one satisfactory conclusion to our puzzle could be ‘Jenny Horne’ simply meant ‘a person with a dark spirit attached who has been outlawed’. Whether it is the person or the spirit that is outlawed, is yet to be discovered..

The Moonwalk of the Callanish Stones

by 5ocietyx

The Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones are situated near the village of Callanish on the west coast of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.

It is probable that Callanish (or Calanais) – which comprises two other stone circles in addition to the main site – was built some 5,000 years ago as a lunar calendar. The path of the moon, unlike the reliably annual tracks of the sun, only returns to the same point once every 18.6 years. Callanish plots this slow progress, building to a crescendo in the 19th year at the lunar standstill – when the path of the moon is so low that it seems to walk along the horizon before setting within the stone circle.

Callanish’s mystery to the expectant crowd is not merely in the stones, but in their setting within a sacred landscape. To the south-west of the stones is a low, undulating hill known to the local people in Gaelic as Cailleach na Mointeach – the old woman of the moors, or Sleeping Beauty as she is more affectionately known. The contours look irresistibly like a reclining woman. At the lunar standstill the moon rises from behind this hill, tip-toes across her supine body and sets four hours later behind the Clisham, another sacred hill.

This moonwalk will happen throughout the summer once a month until September, and will draw hundreds for a number of reasons. Some people come to worship the full moon, others to witness the goddess walking the earth. All come in expectation of a spiritual experience and to feel the energy of the planet.
From Canadiancontent.net

The Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones

The Callanish Stones aerial

The Callanish Stones aerial

Olympic torch visits Callanish stones

noon

by 5ocietyx

The word ‘noon’ derives from Old English non “3 o’clock p.m., the ninth hour,” and is what appears to be a holographic cryptogram in that its very meaning is encoded into the word itself by a certain sequence of letters which are also holographic cryptograms. Actually, only two letters are used – n and o but both are repeated twice.

We are speculating that the letter ‘n’ in this instance represents the arching path of the sun from east to west across the sky in a 12 hour period. The daily sky-walk of Solaris. The reason the word ‘noon’ is a palindrome (a word that can be spelt the same backwards or forwards) is because no sooner has the sun set on one side of the globe, represented by the letter ‘o’ (‘the little world’) that it rises on the other hemisphere.

‘no on’ reflects this duality of the hemispheres.

In Hebrew the legendary city of the sun, Heliopolis was called ‘On’.


The letter ‘o’ represents the circumference of the earth as well as the globe as a whole.

Arabic-letter-Noon

Noon is the 25th letter of the Arabic alphabet.

http://www.meem40.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Noon.html

The clock-face tracks the journey of the sun as it walks across the sky. The sun is in its zenith at 12 o’clock when both the little hand and the big hand are pointed directly upwards.


Analemma: the Sky-walk of Solaris

by 5ocietyx

This is what the sun’s annual pilgrimage across the heavens looks like.

In astronomy, an analemma from Greek ἀνάλημμα “pedestal of a sundial”) is a curve representing the changing angular offset of a celestial body (usually the Sun) from its mean position on the celestial sphere as viewed from another celestial body (usually the Earth). The term is used when the observed body appears, as seen from the viewing body, to move in a way that is repeated at regular intervals, such as once a year or once a day. The analemma is then a closed curve, which does not change.

Because of the Earth’s annual revolution around the Sun in an orbit that is elliptical and tilted relative to the plane of the equator, an observer at a fixed point on the Earth sees the Sun appear to move in an analemma around a mean position, taking a year to do so. The mean position appears to revolve around the Earth once every mean solar day, because of the Earth’s rotation. This daily revolution is not considered to be averaged out to get the mean. The mean position of the Sun is therefore at the same place in the sky at the same time every day, but not at other times.

Therefore if the observed position of the Sun in the sky is plotted or photographed at the same time every day, or every few days, for a year, the points trace out the analemma.

The Analemma and the Temple of Olympian Zeus

The Analemma and the Temple of Olympian Zeus Credit & Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis

See scienceblogs.com’s article for an in depth scientific explanation of this sublime sacred geometry movement hidden from our perception by time but bought into view by photography and patience. All you need to do is photograph the same spot at the same time over the course of a year.

Infinity symbol

Infinity symbol

Infinity symbol

The Sun’s percieved journey over a year is an exquistite if lob-sided infinity symbol

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