Society X

the Great Universe

The Dark Pyramids of Amerika: The Luxor Hotel and the black cubes of Saturn

by 5ocietyx

Luxor pyramid, Las Vegas

Luxor pyramid, Las Vegas

The Luxor Hotel complex in Las Vegas is ancient Egypt with a liquor license and stake money.

The Great Pyramid of Giza had a smooth limestone surface that would have dazzled in the African sun as a brilliant white. It is also missing its golden capstone.

The dark pyramid of Las Vegas has a black surface and an illuminated capstone that sometimes shoots an artificial beam of light into the sky at night-time.

Somewhere in his voluminous work, Manly P Hall observed that all the great structural achievements of antiquity were either left unfinished or deliberately scarred so as to remind the builders that the Great Work of the Ages was a work in progress and like mankind’s spiritual advancement was not yet completed

The builders of The Luxor Hotel thought they wouldn’t muck around. The pyramid took just a few years to erect and when it was complete its capstone was also added. Rather than precision align the pyramid to the stars and harness stellar energy flows, a spotlight does the job just as well albeit it’s just an illusion.

A huge advert for Absolut vodka can be seen draped over it in the photo below.

Inside the pyramid can be found a fake city that contains a casino. Casinos are essentially pseudo-random number generators with enough checks to ensure the house always wins. They harvest negative energy, both emotional and monetary and turn it into food. They continually instill a sense of luck and guesswork and a ‘get rich quick’ mindset as opposed to assured reasoning and hard work.

To our way of thinking, the appearance of the Luxor complex in the barren desert of Las Vegas isn’t so much a manifestation of the ancient Egyptian mystery schools  in America but more an in your face and obvious parody on how far man has fallen since then.

The vodka advert on the outside and casino in the inside is stark testimony.

It says: ‘we’re going to paint our pyramids black, and use them for casinos and saloons and plaster advertising for alcohol all over it. We’re also going to mount a phoney energy portal on the top of it that shoots a spotlight into the air.

None of it is real, it’s all fake, as illusory as a mirage. Casinos thrive on hyper-reality to fool gamblers into thinking the money they are losing isn’t real either, especially if it is transferred for kindergarten currency with big blue and red chips.

Las Vegas means ‘The Meadows’ in Spanish. Vega is also the second brightest star in the northern hemisphere and derives from Arabic (Al Nasr) al Waqi translated variously as “the eagle of the desert” or “the falling vulture.”

All of Las Vegas is hyper-real. The misery for an endless stream of gamblers is that this mirage is only too real.

Luxor Hotel, Las Vegas

Ridiculous: Luxor Hotel complex, Las Vegas

Perhaps the appearance of two ‘kaabaesque’ buildings with larger-than-life mannequins adorning their entire height next to the Luxor complex gives an indication as to the ideas behind it?

The Ealing Jazz Club and the genesis of the Rolling Stones

by 5ocietyx

Rolling Stones Ealing Jazz Club

The opening of the Ealing Blues Club by Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies in March 1962, is generally regarded as the pivotal moment when British Blues developed its own identity. British musicians played the blues and were given an opportunity to see other British artists playing the music for the first time. Prior to this date the growing interest in the Blues had been fostered by Jazz musicians, such as Chris Barber who had brought some of the leading Black American artists to the U.K. for the first time.

By the end of 1962, the club had overseen the creation of the Rolling Stones who were brought together by Alexis Korner and played there over 20 times. Eric ClaptonRod Stewart and Pete Townshend played Ealing, as did many other members of future bands that would later take the rawer sound of ROCK to the world.

The Ealing Club and Blues Incorporated led directly to the early 1960’s British Rhythm and Blues Boom, which created the more intense sounds that were to influence so many. This included the Beatles, who had already opened the gates in the U.S. for the next wave of British bands. Groups such as the Rolling StonesCreamThe Who,Manfred MannThe YardbirdsJohn MayallThe Pretty ThingsFleetwood MacThe Animals and Free, to name but a few, all participated or were heavily influenced by the scene generated by the Ealing Club.

British Rhythm and Blues would soon spread to other London venues notably theCrawdaddyEel Pie IslandThe Flamingo and the Marquee. Here in Ealing the foundations for this movement were already set in stone. Ealing resident Pete Townshend would develop feedback on his guitars at the first Who gigs at the Oldfield hotel (Greenford). He practiced his auto-destructive art on the Marshall speakers sourced locally in the first Marshall shop in Hanwell.

His inspiration for destruction of guitars and amplifiers came from art classes attended at Ealing art school, where subsequent students would also include Ronnie WoodDavid Bowie and Freddie Mercury.

As a showman and musician Jimi Hendrix would be deeply influenced by the music of The Who and their contemporaries, even deciding to purchase his amplifiers from the Marshall shop in Hanwell.

Perhaps the following quote from the Keith Richards biography “Life” from 2010 says it all:

“Cyril Davies and Alexis Korner got a club going, the weekly spot at the Ealing Jazz Club, where Rhythm and Blues freaks could conglomerate. Without them there might have been nothing”

Source: http://www.ealing-club.com/ealingclubhistory/

The club is also noteworthy as the place where on 7 April 1962, Alexis Korner introduced Mick Jagger and Keith Richards to Brian Jones, and the nucleus of The Rolling Stones first came together.

Other regular musicians at the Saturday night sessions included Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker, Charlie Watts, Graham Bond, Long John Baldry, Rod Stewart, Dick Heckstall-Smith and Paul Jones. Manfred Mann (originally the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers) also played there.The Who played there early on in their career, when they were known as The Detours. Eric Burdon (lead singer of The Animals) and Eric Clapton also frequented and sang on stage at the club.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealing_Jazz_Club

Eel Pie Island: The Birth of Rhythm and Blues

by 5ocietyx

Eel-pie-notice-board

Whilst the birth of British beat and rock music is often associated with the Beatles and the Liverpool Sound of the early 1960s, this quiet corner of West London had an equal and enduring influence.

Taking the grittier sound of R&B and fusing it with their love of electric Rock and Roll, white surburban teenagers began to define the shape of British and international popular music.

In the 1960s The Eel Pie Hotel (on Eel Pie Island, Twickenham) and the Richmond based Crawdaddy Club and National Jazz Festival, along with myriad smaller live venues provided the showcase for performers who have become household names.

The Eel Pie Hotel

The Eel Pie Hotel has a long pedigree. It was a 19th century tourist attraction and in the 1920s and 30s it hosted ‘tea dances’ on its sprung dance floor.

From ‘tea dances’ to ‘jazz dances’

With its louche atmosphere, junk shop owner Arthur Chisnall saw it as an ideal venue for weekly jazz dances featuring George Melly, Ken Colyer and Kenny Ball. Many jazz greats performed here.

Succumbs to Rhythm & Blues

Eel Pie Hotel succumbed to R&B music very early. Many R&B legends performed here – Cyril Davies’ Rhythm & Blues All Stars, Long John Baldry’s Hoochie Coochie Men (with Rod Stewart), John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers (featuring Eric Clapton), the Downliners Sect, the Tridents (featuring Jeff Beck) and of course The Who and The Rolling Stones – all performed on the Island between 1962 and 1967.

Decline and mysterious fall

In 1967, Eel Pie Island was forced to close because the owner could not meet the £200,000 worth of repairs which the police had deemed necessary and squatters soon moved in. In 1969, the Club briefly reopened as Colonel Barefoot’s Rock Garden, welcoming progressive bands like Black Sabbath and the Edgar Broughton Band. In 1971, after a demolition order, the Eel Pie Island Hotel burnt down ‘in mysterious circumstances’.

Source: The Twickenham Museum

There is a 'Birth of Rythm and Blues'  exhibition on 29 September in Orleans House

There is a ‘Birth of Rhythm and Blues’ exhibition on 29 September in Orleans House

Eel Pie Island

Artist’s studio on Eel Pie Island

Loveshack Eel Pie Island

Loveshack: one of many artist studio’s on Eel Pie Island, a hippie commune isolated from the mainland and frozen in time.

Eel Pie Island

Bletchley Leisure Centre, Milton Keynes

by 5ocietyx

Bletchley Leisure Centre

Bletchley Leisure Centre since demolished

The Bletchley Leisure Centre is an indoor leisure facility in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England.

The new Bletchley Leisure Centre opened in 2009 replacing the original centre next door to it.

The original centre opened in the 1970s replacing the outdoor queens pool, the centre was quite iconic with its pyramid building that housed the pool. Until the 1990s it also had a multi storey car park with a snake like walkway that went from the carpark to the centre reception.

When the new centre opened the old one was demolished and the site was cleared for housing and a new multi storey carpark. Some people tried to get the pyramid building listed to prevent demolition.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bletchley_Leisure_Centre

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The Milton Keynes Midsummer Leyline revisited

by 5ocietyx

Milton Keynes

A discussion in the comments section of the earlier post ‘The Milton Keynes Midsummer Leyline‘ with the author of a new book Mysterious Milton Keynes, James Willis, resulted in, on his suggestion, a reappraisal of the actual date the sun rises in line with Midsummer Boulevard. The assumed date was 24 June which is traditionally known as Midsummer’s Day.

Through the use of Google Earth video tours and SunCalc we deduced that the sun rose along Midsummer Boulevard precisely one month later on 24 July.

We have built a micro-site detailing these observations and will update the site when new information becomes available and once we have conducted a long planned visit to collect data.

Check out the site here.

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