Society X

the Great Universe

Month: September, 2014

Ata the 6 inch tall humanoid

by 5ocietyx

Ata

Ata the 6 inch humanoid takes his name from the Atacama Desert.  He was discovered by Oscar Munoz in 2003 in a ghost-town.  He literally ended up in the hands of  businessman Ramón Navia-Osorio.  Since then, the film-makers of Sirius promoted the idea that Ata was alien in origin.

However, in 2013 scientists from Stanford University shatterered UFO buffs hopes by announcing a DNA test confirmed he was human.

Far from resolving the mystery however it only deepens and perhaps makes us question whether fairy-tales we were told as children may contain more truth than we imagined.

Tom Thumb
Tom Thumb is a character of English folklore. The History of Tom Thumb was published in 1621, and was the first fairy tale printed in English. Tom is no bigger than his father’s thumb, and his adventures include being swallowed by a cow, tangling with giants,  and becoming a favourite of King Arthur. The earliest allusions to Tom occur in various 16th century works such as Reginald Scot’s Discovery of Witchcraft (1584) where Tom is cited as one of the supernatural folk employed by servant maids to frighten children.

Stories of elves, pixies, gnomes, and all manner of sprightly creatures have been handed down to us by our ancestors. So too have accounts of giants and other supposedly mythical creatures.

What else is being hidden away in the dusty vaults of the prestigious museums and universities because their very existence presents a disruptive nightmare to the cobweb of  lies woven over centuries by the gatekeepers of all our histories?

Ata

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Thumb
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atacama_skeleton

 

 

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Elfin Oak and the little people

by 5ocietyx

Elfin-Oak

The Elfin Oak is a 900-year-old tree stump in Kensington Gardens in London, carved and painted to look as though elves, gnomes and small animals are living in its bark.

The hollow log originally came from Richmond Park, and was moved to Kensington Gardens in 1928 as part of George Lansbury’s scheme of public improvements in London. Over the next two years the illustrator Ivor Innes carved the figures of the “Little People” into it. These included Wookey the witch, with her three jars of health, wealth and happiness, Huckleberry the gnome, carrying a bag of berries up the Gnomes’ Stairway to the banquet within Bark Hall, and Grumples and Groodles the Elves being awakened by Brownie, Dinkie, Rumplelocks and Hereandthere stealing eggs from the crows’ nest.

The inside cover of Pink Floyd’s 1969 album Ummagumma features a picture of David Gilmour in front of the Elfin Oak.

Elfin-oak

Elfin-oak1

 

Elfin-tree

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elfin_Oak

Falstaff of Brentford

by 5ocietyx

John-Lowin

The Three Pigeons was once a bustling tavern that used to grace the south-west corner of the Brentford Market Place. In its heyday in the 17th and 18th century, when Brentford was a busy market and resort town, it was a coaching inn, which could stable up to one hundred horses. It sadly closed in 1916.

There is an etching of The Three Pigeons done in 1848 which gives some idea of the Inn.

Fortunately for us, its reputation for entertainment has been captured and preserved in many references to it in literature. I have been uncovering a few, which build a picture of a lively and attractive place and a source of material for writers.

But first let me introduce a great Shakespearean actor who was the landlord of The Three Pigeons, John Lowin, and appropriately enough his great role was Falstaff.

John Lowin was an actor who became the innkeeper of The Three Pigeons Inn, and died there in 1659. With Shakespeare, he was a member of the King’s Men theatre company, well remembered for his Falstaff role. An article on “Falstaffs, Past and Present” in the New York Times (1894):

“The original Falstaff is said to have been John Heminges, but Davies in his “Dramatic Miscellanies” disputes this, and gives the honour to William Lowin. Lowin played the part for forty years, until the Long Parliament made the giving of “stage plays and interludes” a crime. Then Lowin opened a public house at Brentford, called The Three Pigeons, and here he had as a companion Joseph Taylor, said to have beeen the original Hamlet. Lowin and Taylor led a precarious life, only brightened now and then by a few members of royalty and several commoners, who apprecaites the drama, and patronised The Three Pigeons to hear Lowin and Taylor recite Falstaff and Hamlet.”

In “Shakespeare and the Modern Stage with Other Essays” (1907) Sidney Lee refers to Lowin and Taylor’s time at Brentford:

Of the twenty-five actors who are enumerated in a preliminary page of the great First Folio, as filling in Shakespeare’s lifetime chief roles in his plays, few survived him long. All of them came in personal contact with him; several of them constantly appeared with him on the stage from early days.

The two who were longest lived, John Lowin and Joseph Taylor, came at length to bear a great weight of years. They were both Shakespeare’s juniors, Lowin by twelve years, and Taylor by twenty; but both established their reputation before middle age. Lowin at twenty-seven took part with Shakespeare in the first representation of Ben Jonson’s “Sejanus” in 1603. He was an early, if not the first, interpreter of the character of Falstaff. Taylor as understudy to the great actor Burbage, a very close ally of Shakespeare, seems to have achieved some success in the part of Hamlet, and to have been applauded in the role of Iago, while the dramatist yet lived. When the dramatist died in 1616, Lowin was forty, and Taylor over thirty.

Subsequently, as their senior colleagues one by one passed from the world, these two actors assumed first rank in their company, and before the ruin in which the Civil War involved all theatrical enterprise, they were acknowledged to stand at the head of their profession. Taylor lived through the Commonwealth, and Lowin far into the reign of Charles the Second, ultimately reaching his eighty-third year. Their last days were passed in indigence, and Lowin when an octogenarian was reduced to keeping the inn of the Three Pigeons, at Brentford.”

I have not found any evidence for Shakespeare having visited the Three Pigeons, but it would be magical if Shakespeare had thought up the character of the Old Woman of Brentford in The Merry Wives of Windsor, from a visit to the Three Pigeons!

Source:
http://www.brentforddockresidents.co.uk/artthreepigeons.php

DNA drip-feeds truth about our origins

by 5ocietyx

warrior archetype

According to a new paper recently published ‘The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports.’

Although hinting at a hybrid-origin, the following article is essentially a mix of speculation, biased data analysis and wishful thinking, along with a healthy dose of contradiction in order to cover up the BS.

new map of old europe

So where did fair pigmentation in present-day Europeans come from? The farmer seems to be on her way there, carrying a gene variant for light skin that’s still around today.

“There’s an evolutionary argument about this – that light skin in Europe is biologically advantageous for people who farm, because you need to make vitamin D,” said David Reich.’

‘”It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn’t exist any more,” Prof Reich told BBC News.’

Although we do not have the credentials to write a paper on it, the idea of blue-eyed people being both dark skinned and dark haired seems like a contradiction to the genetic data, which, for the last half a century has concluded that blue eyes, blonde hair and fair skin are all recessive alleles, that is, they are not dominant when mixed with dark hair, dark skin and brown eyes. For the recessive traits to be positively selected suggests the selection occurred over tens of thousands of years, and not just thousands. And where were these farmers farming? In the North Pole? At night? Because if the sun was anything like it is now, a farmer with pale skin would burn in the sun, dark skin being much more preferable to farming than the pale skin of modern Europeans. Besides, pale skin also has the ability to take on a tan, which suggests its origin may lay in a somewhat milder climate than Africa – or the Middle-East – can ever offer. For if the climate was similar all year round then pale skin would have been selected out, and all Europeans would be dark. So the origin of pale skin cant be Africa, and its probably not even Europe, it must be somewhere where the sun is not strong all year round, but is strong enough at some times of the year for a tan to be evolutionarily selected.

Yet another example of the apologist ‘Out of Africa’ theory being pushed by the cultural Marxists and their anthropological propagandists waging a secret war on all of our ancestors.

The 5ociety will continue to monitor the purposeful destruction of humanity.

For an alternative theory on the origin of white skin see our piece on Neoteny. There are other traits that arrived with modern humans which are more prominent or developed in Caucasians, which also hint at the enigmatic origin of this controversial skin-tone, please see this piece for more information Early Humans kept their chin up.

 

taken from –

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-29213892

http://evoandproud.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/puzzle-of-european-hair-and-eye-color.html

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