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the Great Universe

Category: Astrology

Osterley Park: The Holy Grail

by 5ocietyx

Osterley Park lake

Osterley Park lake

According to Mary Caine’s Kingston Zodiac, Osterley Park forms the sign of Aquarius equating it with the phoenix-eagle, or waterpot, cauldron or grail.

“The earliest Chaldean sign for Aquarius was simply a water-pot. But crested bird, Cauldron and Grail all symbolise much the same idea; rebirth on a higher octave. Crested eagles, phoenixes and even peacocks sometimes appeared on Roman and early Christian tombstones; the crest signifying where the spirit escaped from the body. Just as the old or dead were plunged into the legendary cauldron and were revived, so the phoenix rose from its own ashes with the new year.”

Map of Osterley overlay on Aquarius of the Kingston Zodiac

Map of Osterley overlay on Aquarius of the Kingston Zodiac

As you enter the park through its front gates and walk up the tree-lined Alameda you instantly become aware of its rejuvenating qualities and peacefulness. On a summer’s day a breeze whistles through the towering row of trees before you reach the lake which forms the phoenix’s left leg.

A royal legend that adds intrigue to the zodiac theory is the story of how Edward III gave Osterley to a man called Fawkener on condition that he rode round it annually with a falcon on his wrist. This appears to be an example of nominative determinism.

Osterley Park crop field

Osterley Park crop field

Caine also links ‘Kew Garden’s heaven‘ with the ‘man-made hell of Brentford’ and ‘Syon House’s heavenly gates‘ with Osterley’s Easter Resurrection.

‘Three adjacent signs here stamp Man’s evolutionary journey on the landscape – from primal innocence through bitter experience to final illumination.’

The 5ociety concurs with Caine’s theory on the origin of the place-name ‘Oster-ley’ associating it with the goddess Ostara as well as the Great West ley-line that becomes the ‘A30 ley-line’. The Piccadilly line runs through Osterley and according to Alfred Watkins and a book called London’s Ley Lines – Pathways of Enlightenment’ is itself a ley-line that runs parallel to the Great West Road at this juncture.

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Two eagles stand guard over the en-trance to Osterley House and an aviary once existed nearby in the park that housed among other creatures, the gold pheasant and bald eagle that are both associated with the phoenix.

Horace Walpole of Strawberry Hill remarked on Osterley House

“Oh, the palace of palaces! And yet a palace sans crown, sans coronet, but such expense! Such taste! Such profusion! The old house I have often seen, which was built by Sir Thomas Gresham; but it is so improved and enriched that all the Percies and Seymores of Syon must die with envy.”

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

He was less enamoured with the park itself labelling it ‘the ugliest spot in the universe’. Anyone who visits Osterley Park today will probably think the opposite especially if they venture into the gardens to the rear of the house which contain a Robert Adams Orangery and Temple of Pan and is one of the most idyllic corners of England but sadly the National Trust has in recent years placed a paywall at its en-trance.  Among its other natural wonders are a sacred grove of rhododendrons, a walled garden and mature cedars.

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

Nevertheless, the common man, a theme of Aquarius, can still wander freely along the lake and through another copse of mature cedars beside Osterley House adorned by its dreamy wisteria like a jewelled necklace and can still enter the gardens for a few pounds.

If you are early enough and fortunate you can see the sight of a swan using the lake as a runway before taking flight signifying the freedom and majesty the Holy Grail of Osterley heralds for one and all.

Swan, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha

Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha, the largest Sikh temple in Europe viewed from Osterley Park

St Mary's church from Osterley Park

St Mary’s church steeple from Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

golden lake, Osterley Park

golden lake, Osterley Park

Robert-Adams-Osterley-Park1

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Stone eagle looks to the north guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle looks to the north guarding Osterley House

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Lake, Osterley Park

Lake, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan-Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Crop field-Osterley Park

Crop field, Osterley Park

Brutus the Trojan King of Britain

by 5ocietyx

Someone once said the British are a bastard nation, in reference to there not being one particular tribe of British people who have inhabited the island for thousands of years, but more their being the result of a steady influx of foreigners. But the origin of the people who came to be known to the writers of history as British is still a hotly contested topic, one laced with centuries of intrigue and deception all of its own.

It is said in two of the most famous attempts at chronicling the nation – those of Nennius and Geoffrey of Monmouth – that the country was historically settled by a king known as Brutus, a member of a refugee community from the Trojan war. Both Geoffrey and Nennius claimed to have garnered their information from older sources, that we speculate have since been recovered and obscured by the Romans, or the Catholic Church, who both attempted to totally eradicate local historic knowledge during their repression and subjugation of conquered nations. In their tireless (and thankless) research, Alan Wilson and Baram Blackett have attempted to qualify the claims of Geoffrey of Monmouth and Nennius, and have in fact recovered many more folk stories that tell a similar story to the British works. But their research has been hampered by the red tape of bureaucracy, and a narrow-minded academia, who steadfastly refuse to accept anything other than an Anglo-Saxon origin for their people. The suppression of the Scottish, Welsh and Irish cultures by these same Anglo-Saxons continues to this day, and along with their admiration for Greek and Roman ideals, is the culture of what we know today as English.

Whilst exiled in Greece Brutus made himself known as a great warrior, to the point where he was seen as a potential leader and saviour. ‘His fame spreading over all countries, the Trojans from all parts began to flock to him, desiring under his command, to be freed from subjection to the Greeks.’ So already we have in the origins of Brutus an idea of escaping the Greeks, not admiring them.

During his messianic flight, Brutus and his group encountered a deserted island where they came across a temple devoted to Diana. Making libations to the Goddess he fell asleep by the altar, when he was visited in a dream by Diana, who said to him,

‘Brutus! there lies beyond the Gallic bounds
An island which the western sea surrounds,
By giants once possessed; now few remain
To bar thy entrance, or obstruct thy reign.
To reach that happy shore thy sails employ;
There Fate decrees to raise a second Troy,
And found an empire in thy royal line
Which Time shall ne’er destroy, nor bounds confine.’

They sailed west around Africa and stopped in France to do battle, before continuing on to the Isle then known as Albion, which was still inhabited by ‘the giants of old’. After quickly dispensing with the already dying race of giants Brutus and his people established their ‘Troia Nova’ – New Troy, in London, where Brutus was sworn in as king, upon the London Stone that now sits forlorn behind a faceless grill in Cannon Street.

The London Stone today.

The remains of this lost tribe, erased from the books of history by an establishment wishing to promote only classical Greco-Roman philosophies and practices, can still be decoded in place names and words of the British Isles. Wilson and Blackett claim it is the language of the Welsh, the Khymri, that is the original language of the Brutans, a language which came with the refugees from their homeland in the Middle-East. Interestingly, Wilson also claims the etymology of the English county name ‘Surrey’ is from Syria, where the Brutans originated. And phonetically, the Welsh, Cornish and French Breton languages are so similar, as to suggest that these are one tongue, separated only by passage of time. So place names such as ‘Ilfracombe’ in Devon, and ‘Blaen Cwm’ in Wales, ie. with the suffix ‘coom’ (which means ‘valley’ in Cymric), are actually no different when spoken – the Cymric pronunciation of the letter ‘W’ being an ‘oo’ sound. Swansea is known as ‘Abertawe’ to the Welsh, ‘Aber’ being a prefix for an estuary. As well as Welsh places such as ‘Aberfan’ and ‘Aberystwyth’, we see this word as far away as ‘Aberdeen’, which suggests the Scottish also once shared a common tongue with the Khymry of Wales.

The Druids, who dwelt all over Europe at one point, were said to have been destroyed finally by the Romans in Anglesey, the small island in the north-west of Wales. If its true that the Welsh were the unblemished descendants of the Brutans, then this chase into the Druid stronghold of Wales suggest to us that the Druids predated the Celts, who supplanted the British before the Romans in turn ‘civilised’ them. The Druids were wise men to the Celts even, who traveled across the Europe of their day to study under them. Old Welsh names for Anglesey include Ynys Dywyll (“Shady” or “Dark Isle”) perhaps for its former groves, and Ynys y Cedairn (“Isle of the Brave”) for its royal courts. (see Bryn Celli Ddu – the mound in the Dark Grove)

The Glastonbury Zodiac

In the Welsh countryside, Wilson and Blackett claim to have discovered an ancient zodiac, marked out with mounds and monuments, charting the positions of the twelve constellations of an older zodiac than we know today, much the same as Mary Caine’s Kingston Zodiac, and Katherine Maltwood’s now famous Glastonbury Zodiac, which include the Bird (phoenix, or dove?) instead of the Libra, or scales. Were these zodiac sectors the original boroughs of cities founded by these proto-Britons? It is said the zodiac we know today originated in the Middle-East with the Chaldeans, in around 700 BC, but that their zodiac contains the scales as Libra. It would then make sense that the older Brutan zodiac should contain a different sign for Libra, the Bird.

Below is an interview with the no-nonsense Alan Wilson, on his research into the two King Arthurs, which touches on the subject of the suppression of Brutus, as King of the Britons.

see also –

Britain: an Island of Tolerance

Inside the heart of Sagittarius the Hunter

by 5ocietyx

Was the Sphinx previously a lion?

by 5ocietyx

Professor Robert Schoch, a geologist and ancient civilisation researcher thinks that the Sphinx may have been a lion originally.

‘…if you look at the current Great Sphinx you may notice that the head is actually too small for the body. It is clear to me that the current head is not the original head. The original head would have become severely weathered and eroded. It was later re-carved, during dynastic times, and in the re-carving it naturally became smaller. Thus, the head of the Great Sphinx is not the original head. In fact, the Sphinx may not have originally been a sphinx at all. Perhaps it was a male lion.’

Taken from –

http://www.robertschoch.com/sphinxcontent.html

Sagittarius: Star Temple of Richmond Park

by 5ocietyx

Mary Caine Kingston Zodiac

It is remarkable how bends in the Thames allow for his horse’s head and legs. Is the Archer helmeted or hooded? Arthur or Robin Hood? Arthur Road on his helmet near Kingston Gate would seem to identify him with the Glastonbury Zodiac’s Sagittarian hero, but Robin Hood Lane and Gate, and Robin Hood Hill, marked on old maps in the Old Deer Park on his horse’s front leg plead for Robin, the people’s Saxon champion

http://www.stmgrts.org.uk/archives/2011/09/the_kingston_zodiac.html

Mary Caine’s Kingston Zodiac

by 5ocietyx

Mary Caine Kingston Zodiac

Mary Caine is well known for her expertise regarding the Glastonbury Zodiac. When a perceptive friend suggested that she should investigate her home area of Kingston Upon Thames for a terrestrial zodiac, her immediate reaction was “Too much”. However, Mary couldn’t help noticing traditional pub names – Ram, Bull, White Hart, Griffin, Three Pigeons, Druid’s Head, North Star etc (though some of these have now changed for the worse!). Further investigation into local customs and folklore led Mary to conclude that there is indeed a zodiac at Kingston, quite possibly linked with the Arthurian legends by the appearance of Bleise/Blaise, Merlin’s mentor, in the centre of the zodiac. The text is well-researched, authoritively argued and well illustrated. A fascinating and thought provoking read with many revelations.

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/GGZodiac2.html

The Thirteenth Sign: Ophiuchus

by 5ocietyx

Ophiuchus

Ophiuchus /ɒˈfjuːkəs/ has sometimes been used in sidereal astrology as a thirteenth sign in addition to the twelve signs of the tropical Zodiac, because the eponymous constellation Ophiuchus (Greek Ὀφιοῦχος “Serpent-bearer”) as defined by the 1930 IAU constellation boundaries is situated behind the sun between November 29 and December 18.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophiuchus_(astrology)


Supermoon

by 5ocietyx

Supermoon

Keep a close eye on the Full Moon this weekend. It is now about as close to the Earth as it ever gets. The Moon regularly comes a little nearer to the Earth, then slips slightly further away. But this doesn’t always happen at Full Moon and it hasn’t happened quite this close to a Full Moon for 100 years. Many expect it to trigger exceptionally high tides. Some are even speaking about earthquakes and floods. But whatever else this ‘Supermoon’ does, it will look unusually big when it rises… and suggests an exceptionally intense weekend for us all.

http://www.cainer.com 

the Pleiades

by 5ocietyx

The seven sisters of Greek mythology known as the Pleiades can be found in the constellation of Taurus, the bull.

The Nile and Orion Starmap

by 5ocietyx

Nile and Orion

http://www.thehiddenrecords.com/orion.htm

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