Society X

the Great Universe

Category: Etymology

The correct way to drive in the EU

by 5ocietyx

rightsideofroad

As we enter the next phase of the European experiment there are still a few unanswered questions regarding uniformity across the Union. For example, we now have bananas that are the right size and shape, and our door handles are all at the same height, but what about the more important regulations, such as acceptable driving behaviour? With vehicles coming and going from Ireland to Lithuania, switching from this side of the road to that, its about time the EU settled the argument: which side of the road should we be driving on?

Of course, the only real answer is the right side. The British drive on the right side of the car, and the left side of the road, which we shall hopefully prove is the right way. We shall also show that mainland Europeans who drive on the left-hand side of the car and the right-hand side of the road are driving the wrong way.

 

Lets look at the etymology of the word RIGHT.

right (adj.1) “morally correct,” Old English riht “just, good, fair; proper, fitting; straight, not bent, direct, erect,” from Proto-Germanic *rekhtaz (cognates: Old Frisian riucht “right,” Old Saxon reht, Middle Dutch and Dutch recht, Old High German reht, German recht, Old Norse rettr, Gothic raihts), from the (Proto-Indo-European) PIE root *reg- “move in a straight line,” also “to rule, to lead straight, to put right” cognates: Greek orektos “stretched out, upright;” Latin rectus “straight, right;” Old Persian rasta- “straight, right,” aršta- “rectitude;” Old Irish recht “law;” Welsh rhaith, Breton reiz “just, righteous, wise”).

opposite of left,” early 12c., riht, from Old English riht, which did not have this sense but meant “good, proper, fitting, straight”

In opposition to ‘left’ (Latin ‘sinister’) we find the usual PIE root (*dek-) is represented by Latin dexter. Other derivations on a similar pattern to English ‘right’ are French ‘droit’, from Latin directus “straight;” Lithuanian ‘labas’, literally “good;” and Slavic words (Bohemian pravy, Polish prawy, Russian pravyj) from Old Church Slavonic ‘pravu’, literally “straight,” from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) “forward, through”

Queen Elizabeth I

Queen Elizabeth I with the globe in her right hand.

 

‘Right’ is a homonym, a word with (multiple, but ultimately) two meanings, one being ‘opposite of left’, and the other ‘straight’ or ‘just’. If we look at how many other words in the English language contain the word ‘right’, or derivations of it, we can clearly see the fundamental meaning. For example Upright, righteous and right-minded are simple English phrases based on ‘right’, and from the Latin ‘regere’ – which meant ‘just’, ‘correct’ etc. as well as ‘to rule’ (from the PIE root ‘reg’) – we get the following English words: erect, correct, direct, rector, reign, regal, royal, regulate, register, regular, regiment and region. The same goes for nearly all the other languages in the Proto-Indo-European family, some derivative of the word ‘right’ or its root ‘reg’ means both ‘opposite of left’ and ‘to rule/correct/straight/good’. It’s almost impossible to say something is correct without using a word that has the root ‘reg’ (one only has to read back over this piece to confirm this).

 

Lets say then that right is correct. Does this mean that driving on the right side of the road is also correct? A ‘No’ would seem to contradict our theory, but we are remember only talking about where you sit in the car. We must also touch on the symbolic nature of the car, and the road it drives on, if we are to draw a satisfactory conclusion regarding the correct side of the road to drive on.

We propose that the Road is a representation of the left-handed, curved, Yin or feminine principle. Unlike the Car (whom we shall also psychoanalyse) a road is passive in the act of driving, and has no moving parts. It lays ahead, stretched wide-open waiting for us to go down it. Road workers lay roads; they are covered with Yin-like broken white lines (unless its the ‘hard shoulder’), they curve and dip, and occasionally are slick and wet, bursting at the drains from the water filling their fallopian pipework. Roundabouts and circular, motherly signs guide and advise you on your journey, pleading with you to drive safely, and only occasionally asking you to ‘give way’.

A car ‘on the other hand’ can quite easily be shown to represent the right-handed, straight-line, Yang or male principle. All moving parts, a car is built on precision engineering and has a forward-pointed aerodynamic shape. Driving a car is about speed and reaction times. They are the spear, and they are the rocket. They are the penis, hard and pointed, thrusting itself into space. Looking under the hood can be equated to pulling back the foreskin, or hood, of the penis. You can be king of the road on that wide-open highway, or you can be Lewis Hamilton in Pole position, with only your helmet visible, racing to the finish line (on a round track of course, the feminine), where, if you are the victor, you can climax champagne. In evolutionary terms, to finish first would be beneficial to the continued survival of your genes. It is an instinct-driven symbol of dominance and can be traced back in Humans tens of thousand, if not hundreds of thousands of years – although in Formula 1 they don’t make the loser eat the soggy biscuit.

Lewis Hamilton coming first

Note: The act of entering a car could be said to symbolise re-entering the womb. We feel safe inside a car, strapped in surrounded by air bags, the mirrors showing a twisted, dream-like world, weird but occasionally observable, like the pineal gland third eyes are looking out of the back of the head, passively observing the world disappearing into the distance, everything in reverse.

So, linguistically, symbolically and even genetically there seems to be a good argument to suggest that sitting on the right-hand side of the car, and on the left-hand side of the road is the correct way to drive. Nearly every language in the EU would have to agree, as these languages – going right back to the invention of PIE – agree. You sit on the right side of the car, because its right, for lots of reasons. It therefore represents the male principle, which means you drive on the left hand side of the road, because the road is the female principle. And thus we have balance.

English know how to drive

English know how to drive

Of course, this is all tongue in cheek, but there is a serious point to make. If we are to live harmoniously in the new Europe, we believe it is important to retain as much of the spirit of our ancestors, and their wisdom, as we can. The example we have chosen to highlight – as well as proving finally that the British way of driving is the correct way – serves more as an examination of ancient wisdom. Still today we have words with histories that lead to the conceptual mind of early humans, which leads to enlightenment, and which in turn gives the seeker a better understanding of the whole – the material, the abstract and the spiritual. A reformation of this ancient knowledge – that is hidden within our languages, our histories, our mythologies and our symbols – is no bad thing, it would give us all a solid ground from which to build on, and a better understanding of who we are, which is essential in understanding each other. But rather, intent on seeing through their experiment and super-imposing a multi-monoculture onto Europe, our Masters are destroying some of the oldest, richest and enlightened cultures on Earth.

The destruction of culture is the destruction of ancient wisdom, as culture is only built on ancient wisdom.

The new EU campaign

EU symbols under one symbol poster

 

Who knows, if all Europeans did adopt the natural, British style of driving, they might actually drive better? X

An Italian driver today.

An Italian driver today.

taken from –

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=right&allowed_in_frame=0

 

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Etymology of the word ‘guilt’

by 5ocietyx

Old English gylt “crime, sin, fault, fine,” of unknown origin, though some suspect a connection to Old English gieldan “to pay for, debt,” but OED editors find this “inadmissible phonologically.”

The suspicion that the word ‘guilty’ originates from ‘gieldan’ meaning ‘to pay a debt’ makes sense even if the OED consider it inadmissable phonologically speaking.

When the courts find a defendant guilty the next thing they do is make them ‘pay their debt to society’.

Meaning of the surname ‘Hearst’

by 5ocietyx

William Randolph Hearst

William Randolph Hearst, almost single handedly gives the ‘Reptilian Agenda’ theory credence.

William Randolph Hearst founded a deadwood newspaper empire that still persists today based on the destruction of virgin forests (and the outlawing of hemp, much to Henry Ford’s chagrin).

Strange then, that the surname ‘Hearst’ means someone who lived on a wooded hill or refers to a grove, wooded eminence or underwood.

Source: https://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Hearst

Boudica: Etymology and Profile

by 5ocietyx

Boudica (also known as Boudicca/Boadicea, Welsh Buddug (d. AD 60 or 61) was queen of the Iceni tribe of Britons who led an uprising against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire. As all records of the British people were supposedly destroyed by the Romans, knowledge of Boudica comes only from them.

Tacitus and Dio agree that Boudica was of royal descent. Dio says that she was “possessed of greater intelligence than often belongs to women”, that she was tall and had hair described as red, reddish-brown, or tawny hanging below her waist. Dio also says she had a harsh voice and piercing glare, and habitually wore a large golden necklace (perhaps a torc), a many-coloured tunic, and a thick cloak fastened by a brooch.

 

Etymology of the name ‘Boudica’

Tacitus the Roman clearly spelled the name Boudicca. other Roman inscriptions spell the name as Boudica(Lusitania), Boudiga (Bordeaux), and Bodicca (Algeria)

Kenneth Jackson concludes the correct spelling of the name in the British language is Boudica, pronounced [bɒʊˈdiːkaː], and that the name derives from the Proto-Celtic feminine adjective *boudīka, meaning “victorious”, that in turn was derived from the Celtic word *bouda, “victory” (cf. Irish bua (Classical Irish buadh), Buaidheach, Welsh buddugoliaeth).

The closest English equivalent to the vowel in the first syllable is the ow in “bow-and-arrow”). The modern English pronunciation is /ˈbdɪkə/, and it has been suggested that the most comparable English name, in meaning only, would be “Victoria”. This led to a revival of Boudica during the reign of Queen Victoria, who was often portrayed as the rebel queen, heading an empire upon which the sun never set.

Corduene, ancient Kurdistan – heartland of the Djinn?

by 5ocietyx

ancient Corduene

Corduene (also known as GordueneCordyeneCardyeneCardueneGordyeneGordyaeaKordueneKorchaykGordian, Hebrew:קרטיגיני ) was an ancient region located in northern Mesopotamia, present-day south-eastern Turkey and northern Iraq.

It has been cited as the country of the Carduchians (Kardashians?), a fertile mountainous district, rich in pasturage. The three principalities of CordueneMoxoene, and Zabdicene are referred to as Carduchian dynasties by Toumanoff. The Kingdom of Gordyene emerged from the declining Seleucid Empire and for most of its history, it was a province of the Roman Empire and acknowledged the sovereignty of Rome. From 189 to 90 BC it enjoyed a period of independence. The people of Gorduene were known to have worshipped the Hurrian sky God Teshub.

19th-century scholars, such as George Rawlinson, identified Corduene and Carduchi with the modern Kurds, considering that Carduchi was the ancient lexical equivalent of “Kurdistan”. This view is supported by some recent academic sources which have considered Corduene as proto-Kurdish or as equivalent to modern-day Kurdistan.

 

Jewish sources trace origins of people of Corduene to marriage of Jinns of King Solomon with 500 beautiful Jewish women. The same legend was also used by the early Islamic authorities to explain origins of Kurds.

taken from – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corduene

Djinn straight from the bottle

Children of the Djinn (taken from The Forbidden Legacy of a Fallen Race by Andrew Collins)

‘The angel-worshipping cults of Kurdistan see themselves only as descendents of the patriarch Noah, the saviour of humanity whose direct family settled in their land. In contrast, the Kurdish Jews preserve a very curious story concerning the origins of their gentile neighbours, whom they refer to as “children of the djinn”. They say that long ago King Solomon ordered 500 djinn to find him 500 of the most beautiful virgins in the world. They were not to return until every last one was in their possession. The djinn had set about their immense task, going to Europe to seek out the maidens. Finally, after gathering together the correct number, the djinn were about to return to Jerusalem when they learnt that Solomon had passed away. In a dilemma, the djinn decided what to do. Should they return the girls to their rightful homes in Europe, or should they remain with them? Because the young virgins had “found favor in the eyes of the jinn, the jinn took them unto themselves as their wives. And they begot many beautiful children, and those children bore more children… And that is the way the nation of the Kurds came into being”.

In another version of the same story, 100 genies are dispatched by Solomon to search out 100 of the world’s most beautiful maidens for his personal harem. Having achieved this quota, Solomon then dies and the 100 genies decide to settle down with the maidens amid the inaccessible mountains of Kurdistan. The offspring of these marriages result in the foundation of the Kurdish race, “who in their elusiveness resemble their genie forefathers and in their handsomeness their foremothers”.’

taken from – http://newdawnmagazine.com/Article/The_Forbidden_Legacy_Part_Three.html

 

Etymology

If we break the syllables down in the word ‘Corduene’ – and its modern equivalent ‘Kurdistan’ – we have two words, ‘Cor’ and ‘duene’. The first word is quite obviously the Proto-Indo-European root ‘Kerd‘, which means ‘core’ or ‘heart’ (see also Latin ‘Cor’). Is it possible the second word – with its unusual second letter ‘U’ – is a root of the word ‘duende‘, the Spanish folklore equivalent to the Arabic ‘Djinn‘? As well as possessing the same first letter as duende ‘Djinn’ also has an unusual second letter, and It is curious to note that the Kurdish people themselves attribute their origin to a mixture of Jewish virgins and Djinn fathers. Another word that has a similar first and second letters is ‘Twin‘. In fact, it’s quite remarkable how the PIE root ‘dwo’ sounds like the first part of ‘duende’. ‘dwo’ was equivalent to the modern English word ‘double’ as well as ‘two’, which reinforces the belief that the Djinn and Duende are somehow our second, or twin.

So was Corduene the ancient heartland of the Duende, or Djinn, the shadowy counterparts (and sometime parents) of the human race?

Core, Coeur, Cor, Kerd

by 5ocietyx

the core of a human

Core (n.) late 14c., probably from Old French coeur “core of fruit, heart of lettuce,” literally “heart,” from Latin cor “heart,” from PIE root *kerd- “heart”.

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=core&allowed_in_frame=0

Note the Proto-Indo-European root of the word ‘core’ is ultimately ‘kerd’. This is also the root of the Germanic-origin English word ‘heart’.

Etymology of the word ‘Twin’

by 5ocietyx

Dr Jeckle & his other half, Mr Hyde

Old English twinn “consisting of two, twofold, double,” probably ultimately from Proto-Germanic *twinjaz (cf. Old Norse tvinnr, Old Danish tvinling, Dutch tweeling, German zwillung), from PIE *dwisno- (cf. Latin bini “two each,” Lithuanian dvynu “twins”), from *dwi- “double,” from root *dwo- “two” (see two). The verb meaning “to combine two things closely” is recorded from late 14c. The noun developed from Old English getwinn “double.”

Note the ultimate root of the word is the Proto-Indo-European ‘dwo-‘. which means ‘two’. whether it would have been used to describe a double or two of something remains unknown.

 

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=twin

Olive O-live, O.

by 5ocietyx

Olives and ovaries

Olives and ovaries

An Italian study found that women whose diets included a lot of olive oil had a 30% lower risk of ovarian cancer. The reasons are unclear, but the healthy fats in the oil may help suppress genes predisposed to causing cancer.

egg (n.) mid-14c., from northern England dialect, from O.N. egg, which vied with M.E. eye, eai (from O.E. æg) until finally displacing it after 1500; both are from P.Gmc. *ajja(m) (cf. O.S., M.Du., Du., O.H.G., Ger. ei, Goth. ada), probably from PIE *owyo-/*oyyo- “egg” (cf. O.C.S. aja, Russian jajco, Breton ui, Welsh wy, Gk. oon, L. ovum); possibly derived from root*awi- “bird.

olive (n.) c.1200, “olive tree,” from O.Fr. olive “olive, olive tree” (13c.) or directly from L. oliva “olive, olive tree,” from Gk. elaia “olive tree, olive,” probably from the same Aegean language (perhaps Cretan) as Armenian ewi “oil.” Applied to the fruit or berry of the tree in English from late 14c. As a color from 17c. Olive branch as a token of peace is from early 13c.

Both words, although geographically and linguistically unrelated ultimately come from a ‘uwi’ sounding word, egg – AWI, and olive – EWI.

See the rest of the series on the Doctrine of Signatures here

Etymology of the word ‘Code’

by 5ocietyx

code (n.) c.1300, “systematic compilation of laws,” from Old French code “system of laws, law-book” (13c.), from Latin codex, earlier caudex “book, book of laws,” literally “tree trunk,” hence, book made up of wooden tablets covered with wax for writing. Meaning “cipher” (the sense in secret code) is from 1808.

presumably the ‘cau-‘ in the word ‘caudex’ comes from the latin caulis (n.) meaning stem or stalk of a plant, from where we get the word ‘cauliflower’.

Can we then also presume that ‘-dex’ comes from the Latin ‘dexter’, meaning “skillful, but also “right (hand) the root of which comes from the PIE ‘*deks-‘. meaning on the right hand (see also Sanskrit ‘daksinah’ “on the right hand, southern, skillful;” Avestan ‘dashina’- “on the right hand;” Greek ‘dexios’ “on the right hand,” also “fortunate, clever;” Old Irish ‘dess’ “on the right hand, southern;” Welsh ‘deheu’; Gaulish ‘Dexsiva’, name of a goddess of fortune; Gothic ‘taihswa’; Lithuanian ‘desinas’; Old Church Slavonic ‘desnu’, Russian ‘desnoj’).

So the word ‘code’ breaks down as ‘the stem (of the body) of the skillful right hand’.

 

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=code&allowed_in_frame=0

Etymology of the word ‘Vatican’

by 5ocietyx

Druids Ovates

The English-Latin noun vates /ˈveɪtiːz/ is a term for a prophet, following the Latin term. It is the origin of the English term ovate for an Irish bard.

In pagan Rome the vates resided on the Vatican Hill, the Hill of the Vatii. Indeed, the Vatican Hill takes it name from the Latin word Vaticanus, a vaticiniis ferendis, in allusion to the oracles, or Vaticinia, which were anciently delivered on the Vatican Hill.

Druids, Vates (or Ovates) and Bards represented the three classes of Celtic priesthood, according to the Ancient Greek writers. Druids played the important role in the Celtic society dealing with magic, religious rites, worship and sacrifices, judicial procedures, literature and language, philosophy, astronomy and medicine. Vates had the role of seers, prophets and performed sacrifices, while Bards were poets and musicians who collected oral traditions, serving to preserve history and spread the fame of brave warriors and kings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vates
http://www.memoryofstones.eu/2/druids_vates_bards_333035.html

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