Society X

the Great Universe

Category: Proto-Indo-European

The correct way to drive in the EU

by 5ocietyx

rightsideofroad

As we enter the next phase of the European experiment there are still a few unanswered questions regarding uniformity across the Union. For example, we now have bananas that are the right size and shape, and our door handles are all at the same height, but what about the more important regulations, such as acceptable driving behaviour? With vehicles coming and going from Ireland to Lithuania, switching from this side of the road to that, its about time the EU settled the argument: which side of the road should we be driving on?

Of course, the only real answer is the right side. The British drive on the right side of the car, and the left side of the road, which we shall hopefully prove is the right way. We shall also show that mainland Europeans who drive on the left-hand side of the car and the right-hand side of the road are driving the wrong way.

 

Lets look at the etymology of the word RIGHT.

right (adj.1) “morally correct,” Old English riht “just, good, fair; proper, fitting; straight, not bent, direct, erect,” from Proto-Germanic *rekhtaz (cognates: Old Frisian riucht “right,” Old Saxon reht, Middle Dutch and Dutch recht, Old High German reht, German recht, Old Norse rettr, Gothic raihts), from the (Proto-Indo-European) PIE root *reg- “move in a straight line,” also “to rule, to lead straight, to put right” cognates: Greek orektos “stretched out, upright;” Latin rectus “straight, right;” Old Persian rasta- “straight, right,” aršta- “rectitude;” Old Irish recht “law;” Welsh rhaith, Breton reiz “just, righteous, wise”).

opposite of left,” early 12c., riht, from Old English riht, which did not have this sense but meant “good, proper, fitting, straight”

In opposition to ‘left’ (Latin ‘sinister’) we find the usual PIE root (*dek-) is represented by Latin dexter. Other derivations on a similar pattern to English ‘right’ are French ‘droit’, from Latin directus “straight;” Lithuanian ‘labas’, literally “good;” and Slavic words (Bohemian pravy, Polish prawy, Russian pravyj) from Old Church Slavonic ‘pravu’, literally “straight,” from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) “forward, through”

Queen Elizabeth I

Queen Elizabeth I with the globe in her right hand.

 

‘Right’ is a homonym, a word with (multiple, but ultimately) two meanings, one being ‘opposite of left’, and the other ‘straight’ or ‘just’. If we look at how many other words in the English language contain the word ‘right’, or derivations of it, we can clearly see the fundamental meaning. For example Upright, righteous and right-minded are simple English phrases based on ‘right’, and from the Latin ‘regere’ – which meant ‘just’, ‘correct’ etc. as well as ‘to rule’ (from the PIE root ‘reg’) – we get the following English words: erect, correct, direct, rector, reign, regal, royal, regulate, register, regular, regiment and region. The same goes for nearly all the other languages in the Proto-Indo-European family, some derivative of the word ‘right’ or its root ‘reg’ means both ‘opposite of left’ and ‘to rule/correct/straight/good’. It’s almost impossible to say something is correct without using a word that has the root ‘reg’ (one only has to read back over this piece to confirm this).

 

Lets say then that right is correct. Does this mean that driving on the right side of the road is also correct? A ‘No’ would seem to contradict our theory, but we are remember only talking about where you sit in the car. We must also touch on the symbolic nature of the car, and the road it drives on, if we are to draw a satisfactory conclusion regarding the correct side of the road to drive on.

We propose that the Road is a representation of the left-handed, curved, Yin or feminine principle. Unlike the Car (whom we shall also psychoanalyse) a road is passive in the act of driving, and has no moving parts. It lays ahead, stretched wide-open waiting for us to go down it. Road workers lay roads; they are covered with Yin-like broken white lines (unless its the ‘hard shoulder’), they curve and dip, and occasionally are slick and wet, bursting at the drains from the water filling their fallopian pipework. Roundabouts and circular, motherly signs guide and advise you on your journey, pleading with you to drive safely, and only occasionally asking you to ‘give way’.

A car ‘on the other hand’ can quite easily be shown to represent the right-handed, straight-line, Yang or male principle. All moving parts, a car is built on precision engineering and has a forward-pointed aerodynamic shape. Driving a car is about speed and reaction times. They are the spear, and they are the rocket. They are the penis, hard and pointed, thrusting itself into space. Looking under the hood can be equated to pulling back the foreskin, or hood, of the penis. You can be king of the road on that wide-open highway, or you can be Lewis Hamilton in Pole position, with only your helmet visible, racing to the finish line (on a round track of course, the feminine), where, if you are the victor, you can climax champagne. In evolutionary terms, to finish first would be beneficial to the continued survival of your genes. It is an instinct-driven symbol of dominance and can be traced back in Humans tens of thousand, if not hundreds of thousands of years – although in Formula 1 they don’t make the loser eat the soggy biscuit.

Lewis Hamilton coming first

Note: The act of entering a car could be said to symbolise re-entering the womb. We feel safe inside a car, strapped in surrounded by air bags, the mirrors showing a twisted, dream-like world, weird but occasionally observable, like the pineal gland third eyes are looking out of the back of the head, passively observing the world disappearing into the distance, everything in reverse.

So, linguistically, symbolically and even genetically there seems to be a good argument to suggest that sitting on the right-hand side of the car, and on the left-hand side of the road is the correct way to drive. Nearly every language in the EU would have to agree, as these languages – going right back to the invention of PIE – agree. You sit on the right side of the car, because its right, for lots of reasons. It therefore represents the male principle, which means you drive on the left hand side of the road, because the road is the female principle. And thus we have balance.

English know how to drive

English know how to drive

Of course, this is all tongue in cheek, but there is a serious point to make. If we are to live harmoniously in the new Europe, we believe it is important to retain as much of the spirit of our ancestors, and their wisdom, as we can. The example we have chosen to highlight – as well as proving finally that the British way of driving is the correct way – serves more as an examination of ancient wisdom. Still today we have words with histories that lead to the conceptual mind of early humans, which leads to enlightenment, and which in turn gives the seeker a better understanding of the whole – the material, the abstract and the spiritual. A reformation of this ancient knowledge – that is hidden within our languages, our histories, our mythologies and our symbols – is no bad thing, it would give us all a solid ground from which to build on, and a better understanding of who we are, which is essential in understanding each other. But rather, intent on seeing through their experiment and super-imposing a multi-monoculture onto Europe, our Masters are destroying some of the oldest, richest and enlightened cultures on Earth.

The destruction of culture is the destruction of ancient wisdom, as culture is only built on ancient wisdom.

The new EU campaign

EU symbols under one symbol poster

 

Who knows, if all Europeans did adopt the natural, British style of driving, they might actually drive better? X

An Italian driver today.

An Italian driver today.

taken from –

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=right&allowed_in_frame=0

 

The real Game of Thrones, part 1

by 5ocietyx

The TV series Game of Thrones has gained a huge following since it first aired in 2011. Set in a mythical land the tales of swords and treachery have struck a chord with a viewer-base hungry for stories which were once the domain of fantasy-fiction fanatics and Games Workshoppers, such as Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings.

Although the series is set in a mythical land, it’s obvious GoT creator George RR Martin has an interest in historical, and pre-historical tales, and its well known that he has taken some of the major plot-lines from real events, the war of the roses being an obvious one. Lets take a look at a few that viewers may not know about.

the seven kingdoms

The Number Seven.

Revered throughout time by every human group around the world the number seven is featured heavily in the series. ‘The Faith of the Seven is the principal religion of the Seven Kingdoms. It is little-practiced beyond its borders. The Faith of the Seven is dominant in the south of Westeros.’ But also in our world, the number seven is seen as special. it is a magical number and is associated with luck, the heavenly bodies (five visible planets plus the Sun and the Moon), the days of the week, and the menorah, the Jewish ritual candelabra; there are seven heavens and seven hells in the Islamic faith; there are said to be seven colours in the rainbow and there are over 700 mentions of the number seven in the Bible. So not only is it implicit in the religious stories of Westeros, its also an integral part of the human experience, even today.

the wall

The Wall, and the Wildlings beyond.

Of course, the Wall is a reference to Hadrian’s wall, in the North of England. Hadrian’s Wall (Latin: Vallum Aelium) was a defensive fortification in Roman Britain, begun in AD 122 during the rule of emperor Hadrian. In addition to its military role, gates through the wall served as customs posts.[1]

Although he was Roman emperor, Hadrian was in fact Spanish, and had the wall built for his Italian masters, presumably to protect their assets from the ‘uncivilised’ and unrulable Picti in Caledonia, modern-day Scotland. As well as the controlling Roman army, the wall was most likely manned by up to 10, 000 English slaves and criminals, much like the Wall in Game of Thrones. Later, the wall was manned by the toughest in the land, to help protect what was left of the country after its Roman masters left. This is more than likely the reason for the Geordies of the Newcastle having a reputation for being tough people, which still persists to this day.

Beyond the wall the Picti (and modern day Scots) were known for their red hair and ‘painted’ skin. The Latin word Pict has the same root as pixel or picture, so it may not be that these wildlings were painted with blue woad, as is popularly believed, but that they were overwhelmingly freckled, which could have caused the Mediterranean Romans to declare them ‘painted’ or ‘pixelated’.

Ygrette, Wildling archetype

Dothraki, horse-riders of the curved blade.

Like the Dothraki in Game of Thrones, the Scythians were a cultural group of equine-obsessed warriors, said to be born, to live and to die on the saddle. they were famed for their ability to fire arrows backwards from horse-back, using the scythian bow, and for their ferocious techniques in battle. Their name may have come from their use of scythes, as ‘according to Jack Herer and “Flesh of The Gods” (Emboden, W.A., Jr., Praeger Press, NY, 1974.); the ancient Scythians grew hemp and harvested it with a hand reaper that we still call a scythe.’

‘Their historical appearance coincided with the rise of equestrian semi-nomadism from the Carpathian Mountains of Europe to Mongolia in the Far East during the 1st millennium BC.[4][5] The “classical Scythians” known to ancient Greek historians were located in the northern Black Sea and fore-Caucasus region.’

The Dacians were neighbours to the Scythians, who also rode horse-back and were fames for their skill in battle. the Dacians also carried the curved blade like the Dothraki. this blade, known as a sica was used with devastating effect by the Dacians, much like the Dothraki.

a sica blade

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

taken from –

http://gameofthrones.wikia.com/wiki/Faith_of_the_Seven

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadrian’s_Wall

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scythians

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sica

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacia

Corduene, ancient Kurdistan – heartland of the Djinn?

by 5ocietyx

ancient Corduene

Corduene (also known as GordueneCordyeneCardyeneCardueneGordyeneGordyaeaKordueneKorchaykGordian, Hebrew:קרטיגיני ) was an ancient region located in northern Mesopotamia, present-day south-eastern Turkey and northern Iraq.

It has been cited as the country of the Carduchians (Kardashians?), a fertile mountainous district, rich in pasturage. The three principalities of CordueneMoxoene, and Zabdicene are referred to as Carduchian dynasties by Toumanoff. The Kingdom of Gordyene emerged from the declining Seleucid Empire and for most of its history, it was a province of the Roman Empire and acknowledged the sovereignty of Rome. From 189 to 90 BC it enjoyed a period of independence. The people of Gorduene were known to have worshipped the Hurrian sky God Teshub.

19th-century scholars, such as George Rawlinson, identified Corduene and Carduchi with the modern Kurds, considering that Carduchi was the ancient lexical equivalent of “Kurdistan”. This view is supported by some recent academic sources which have considered Corduene as proto-Kurdish or as equivalent to modern-day Kurdistan.

 

Jewish sources trace origins of people of Corduene to marriage of Jinns of King Solomon with 500 beautiful Jewish women. The same legend was also used by the early Islamic authorities to explain origins of Kurds.

taken from – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corduene

Djinn straight from the bottle

Children of the Djinn (taken from The Forbidden Legacy of a Fallen Race by Andrew Collins)

‘The angel-worshipping cults of Kurdistan see themselves only as descendents of the patriarch Noah, the saviour of humanity whose direct family settled in their land. In contrast, the Kurdish Jews preserve a very curious story concerning the origins of their gentile neighbours, whom they refer to as “children of the djinn”. They say that long ago King Solomon ordered 500 djinn to find him 500 of the most beautiful virgins in the world. They were not to return until every last one was in their possession. The djinn had set about their immense task, going to Europe to seek out the maidens. Finally, after gathering together the correct number, the djinn were about to return to Jerusalem when they learnt that Solomon had passed away. In a dilemma, the djinn decided what to do. Should they return the girls to their rightful homes in Europe, or should they remain with them? Because the young virgins had “found favor in the eyes of the jinn, the jinn took them unto themselves as their wives. And they begot many beautiful children, and those children bore more children… And that is the way the nation of the Kurds came into being”.

In another version of the same story, 100 genies are dispatched by Solomon to search out 100 of the world’s most beautiful maidens for his personal harem. Having achieved this quota, Solomon then dies and the 100 genies decide to settle down with the maidens amid the inaccessible mountains of Kurdistan. The offspring of these marriages result in the foundation of the Kurdish race, “who in their elusiveness resemble their genie forefathers and in their handsomeness their foremothers”.’

taken from – http://newdawnmagazine.com/Article/The_Forbidden_Legacy_Part_Three.html

 

Etymology

If we break the syllables down in the word ‘Corduene’ – and its modern equivalent ‘Kurdistan’ – we have two words, ‘Cor’ and ‘duene’. The first word is quite obviously the Proto-Indo-European root ‘Kerd‘, which means ‘core’ or ‘heart’ (see also Latin ‘Cor’). Is it possible the second word – with its unusual second letter ‘U’ – is a root of the word ‘duende‘, the Spanish folklore equivalent to the Arabic ‘Djinn‘? As well as possessing the same first letter as duende ‘Djinn’ also has an unusual second letter, and It is curious to note that the Kurdish people themselves attribute their origin to a mixture of Jewish virgins and Djinn fathers. Another word that has a similar first and second letters is ‘Twin‘. In fact, it’s quite remarkable how the PIE root ‘dwo’ sounds like the first part of ‘duende’. ‘dwo’ was equivalent to the modern English word ‘double’ as well as ‘two’, which reinforces the belief that the Djinn and Duende are somehow our second, or twin.

So was Corduene the ancient heartland of the Duende, or Djinn, the shadowy counterparts (and sometime parents) of the human race?

Core, Coeur, Cor, Kerd

by 5ocietyx

the core of a human

Core (n.) late 14c., probably from Old French coeur “core of fruit, heart of lettuce,” literally “heart,” from Latin cor “heart,” from PIE root *kerd- “heart”.

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=core&allowed_in_frame=0

Note the Proto-Indo-European root of the word ‘core’ is ultimately ‘kerd’. This is also the root of the Germanic-origin English word ‘heart’.

Etymology of the word ‘Twin’

by 5ocietyx

Dr Jeckle & his other half, Mr Hyde

Old English twinn “consisting of two, twofold, double,” probably ultimately from Proto-Germanic *twinjaz (cf. Old Norse tvinnr, Old Danish tvinling, Dutch tweeling, German zwillung), from PIE *dwisno- (cf. Latin bini “two each,” Lithuanian dvynu “twins”), from *dwi- “double,” from root *dwo- “two” (see two). The verb meaning “to combine two things closely” is recorded from late 14c. The noun developed from Old English getwinn “double.”

Note the ultimate root of the word is the Proto-Indo-European ‘dwo-‘. which means ‘two’. whether it would have been used to describe a double or two of something remains unknown.

 

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=twin

Drachen hohle, Germany

by 5ocietyx

The Drachenhöhle (dragons cave) is in Austria, near Mixnitz, and was named after the finding of the remains of cave bears, which were thought to be the remains of Dragons, as cave bears were unknown to the people who discovered them.

In this sediment a huge amount of remains were found, not just the bones of cave bears, but human remains like ancient fire places and flint tools. These are among the oldest human remains found in Austria, 65.000 to 31.000 years old.

Etymology of the word ‘Code’

by 5ocietyx

code (n.) c.1300, “systematic compilation of laws,” from Old French code “system of laws, law-book” (13c.), from Latin codex, earlier caudex “book, book of laws,” literally “tree trunk,” hence, book made up of wooden tablets covered with wax for writing. Meaning “cipher” (the sense in secret code) is from 1808.

presumably the ‘cau-‘ in the word ‘caudex’ comes from the latin caulis (n.) meaning stem or stalk of a plant, from where we get the word ‘cauliflower’.

Can we then also presume that ‘-dex’ comes from the Latin ‘dexter’, meaning “skillful, but also “right (hand) the root of which comes from the PIE ‘*deks-‘. meaning on the right hand (see also Sanskrit ‘daksinah’ “on the right hand, southern, skillful;” Avestan ‘dashina’- “on the right hand;” Greek ‘dexios’ “on the right hand,” also “fortunate, clever;” Old Irish ‘dess’ “on the right hand, southern;” Welsh ‘deheu’; Gaulish ‘Dexsiva’, name of a goddess of fortune; Gothic ‘taihswa’; Lithuanian ‘desinas’; Old Church Slavonic ‘desnu’, Russian ‘desnoj’).

So the word ‘code’ breaks down as ‘the stem (of the body) of the skillful right hand’.

 

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=code&allowed_in_frame=0

The heretic Stan Gooch vindicated (again)?

by 5ocietyx

In what seems like an almost verbatim retelling of the outcast researcher Stan Gooch’s theory of our evolution, anthropologists claim to have discovered the first Cro-Magnon/Neanderthal hybrid in Northern Italy. The skeletal remains are currently being analysed, but it is suspected that they individual lived 30 – 40, 000 years ago.

‘The genetic analysis shows that the individual’s mitochondrial DNA is Neanderthal. Since this DNA is transmitted from a mother to her child, the researchers conclude that it was a “female Neanderthal who mated with male Homo sapiens.”….The research team hints that the modern humans may have raped female Neanderthals, bringing to mind modern cases of “ethnic cleansing.” (ed. was this the first battle for Europe? See also Biblical account in Genesis of sons of God and daughters of the Earth)

For those who aren’t aware of Stan Gooch’s work, here is a very brief summary of his Hybrid-Origin theory, taken from his 1979 book ‘Guardians of the Ancient Wisdom’:

  1. From other human species, Cro-Magnon man evolves in Northern India during a long period of isolation, develops and practices sun worship and hunting magic; the culture is patriarchal.
  2. Elsewhere during the same period, different forms of Neanderthal evolve in Europe and the Middle East, while moon worship and earth magic is developed and practiced; the culture is matriarchal.
  3. Around 35,000 years ago, Cro-Magnon abandons India and heads west through the Middle East into Europe, overrunning Neanderthal. By 25,000 years ago, the predominant type in Europe is Cro-Magnon.
  4. In the Middle East a hybrid population, a cross between the Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal types, emerges. Pure Neanderthal has largely ceased to exist either here or in Europe.
  5. By 15,000 years ago, pure Cro-Magnon man has also ceased to exist, driven out of north and west Europe, into southern Europe, by renewed glaciation, absorbed by the hybrid type (that is, modern Homo sapiens).

So it looks like the late maverick Gooch is yet again vindicated, but not officially recognized for his years of tireless research, but then, what else would you expect?

taken from –

http://news.discovery.com/human/evolution/neanderthal-skeleton-provides-evidence-of-interbreeding-with-humans-130327.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Gooch

Origin of the Ancient Horn

by 5ocietyx

In a previous post (Jinn Witches of Britain) we tried to solve a riddle regarding the origin of the 16th Century colloquial British term for a witch, Jenny Horne. It was apparently in widespread use, but particularly so in Scotland, where the name was given for the last witch to be executed in Britain.

The root of the English word ‘horn’ comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘hurnaz’, which originates from the PIE *ker, and refers to the uppermost part of the head, in most cases of an animal, and subsequently to an instrument made from this part. The Latin word for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, which presumably also shares its origin in the PIE, as the Latin for a deer is ‘cervus’ whereas the Welsh is ‘carw’. A Uni-corn is also an animal with a single horn.

One theory suggests the origin for the place name Corn-wall comes the Anglo-Saxon word for ‘the Walha (foreigners/Ancient Britons) who live on the Cern (the ‘horn’ of the land)’. Another theory is that it comes from the Cornuvii, a tribe who inhabited parts of Britain when the Romans arrived, and who worshipped the horned god Cernunos, and so took his name in veneration. The ‘Cern’ in Cernunos relays across the ages the physical character of this Celtic god – he is always shown with antlers.

The dictionary of the Scottish Language tells us that the word ‘horne’ was used in 16th century Scotland to ‘proclaim an outlaw, three blasts being blown [from a horn] by the king’s messenger… in the phrases at the horne – outlawed, and to put to the horn –  to outlaw.’

Our previous summary was that the name Jenny (for a witch) came from the same root as the words ‘Jinni’, and ‘Genie’, both of which describe ‘a spirit which is not the soul, but which lives alongside us during our life’. So one satisfactory conclusion to our puzzle could be ‘Jenny Horne’ simply meant ‘a person with a dark spirit attached who has been outlawed’. Whether it is the person or the spirit that is outlawed, is yet to be discovered..

Jinn Witches of Britain

by 5ocietyx

three Scottish witches

The last person to be executed for witchcraft in the British Isles was named Janet Horne, and it was in Dornoch, Scotland in 1727 that she – along with her daughter – was convicted. The name Janet Horne, or Jenny Horne was a generic name at the time for a witch, so the actual name of the convicted woman may not have even been Janet Horne.

Lets take a look at the names Janet and Jenny. Both come from the name Jane. Janet comes from the French diminutive form of Jane, which is an affectionate version of a name given to a child or loved one. In French they add ‘Jan-ette’ to indicate the diminutive, and in the British Isles ‘Jane-y’ is used. So as well as Janet, here we also have a possible explanation for the origin of the name ‘Jenny’. Although, back then Jenny was pronounced ‘Jin-ee’, and it can be said this is a dialectic version of the name ‘Jane’, it is also an old name for an entity that we know today as a ‘Genie’.

The English word ‘Genie’ actually comes via the French ‘Génie’, which in turn comes from the Latin word ‘Genius’, which described a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Ultimately this comes from the PIE root ‘Gen-‘, meaning ‘to produce’. The Arabic word ‘Jinn’ comes from the Arabic root ‘g-n-n’ which means ‘hide, conceal’. ‘Jinn’ means ‘those who are concealed’. It is the name given to a group of spirits who are said to cohabited Earth alongside Humans, but in another realm. The singular term is ‘Jinni’. The French translator of ‘The Book of One Thousand and One Nights’ used the word ‘Génie’ for the Arabic word ‘Jinni’ because he felt it was so similar in meaning and sound.

There is no known link between the roots of these two words, yet both so obviously describe the same phenomenon, a spirit form that is not the Anima, but is still in some way important to the Human experience. Perhaps the Scottish word ‘Jenny’ was in fact an older word too – not an English or Arabic one at all – but a much more ancient indigenous name for someone with a dark, malevolent spirit attached to them. Could all three have ‘coincidentally’ picked the exact same phonetic and descriptive word for this adversary?

The name Horne however still alludes our research. But i think its fair to say we have a good contender for why the name Jenny was used to describe a witch in 16th Century Britain.

ref:

Llewellyn’s Complete Book of Names

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janet_Horne

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