Society X

the Great Universe

Category: Riots

Organised Chaos

by totalgooched


We would like to call to the reader’s attention the recent appearance of these flyers at anti-Trump rallies in America which bear a striking resemblance to flyers handed out at the 2011 London riots. 

The London riots, like the anti-Trump rallies were apparently spontaneous and grass roots incidents, specific to flash point causes, which would have left anyone intent on capitalising on them very little time to organise. So why at both (and probably others) were participants handed these flyers? 

We can almost guarantee there is a hidden hand in the anti-Trump demonstrations, the enemies of humanity are reeling from two defeats this year, but who would have possibly benefitted from a mass chimp-out in London, back in 2011?

The 5ociety continues to monitor the global elitist agenda to destroy the indigenous people of the UK…

The Sacherevell Riots, 1710

by 5ocietyx

Interesting riot situation in which circumstances are not unlike those of present day Britain.

 

The Sacheverell riots were a series of outbreaks of public disorder, which spread across England during the spring, summer and autumn of 1710 in which supporters of the Tories attacked Dissenters’, particularlyPresbyterians’ homes and meeting-houses, whose congregations tended to support the Whigs… The Sacheverell and Rebellion riots are regarded as the most serious instances of public disorder of the eighteenth century.

The riots reflected the dissatisfaction of many Anglicans to the toleration of an increasing number ofIndependent, Baptist, and Presbyterian chapels, which diminished the apparent authority of the Church of England; and were a reaction to perceived grievances against the Whig government, in regard to high taxation resulting from the War of the Spanish Succession, the recent sudden influx of some 10,000 Calvinist refugees from Germany,[3] and the growth of the merchant classes, the so-called “monied interest”.[2]

Rioting broke out in London. On the evening of March 1, protestors attacked an elegant Presbyterian meeting-house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, built only five years before. They smashed the windows, stripped the tiles from the roof and ripped out its interior wooden fittings, which they made into a bonfire. The crowd then marauded through much of the West End of London chanting “High Church and Sacheverell” .[2]

It spread across the country, notably in Wrexham,[5] Barnstaple and Gainsborough, where Presbyterian meeting-houses were attacked, with many being burnt to the ground. The Sacheverell riots and further disturbances in 1714 and 1715, led to the passing of the Riot Act.[6]

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacheverell_riots

Henry Sacheverell and the Riot Act, 1714

by 5ocietyx

Henry Sacheverell /sæˈʃɛvərəl/ (1674 – 15 June 1724) was an English High Church clergyman and politician.

Sacheverell preached his famous sermons—that the church was in danger from the neglect of the Whig ministry to keep guard over its interests—the one at Derby on 15 August 1709 entitled The Communication of Sin, the other at St Paul’s Cathedral on 5 November 1709, entitled The Perils of False Brethren, in Church, and State.

In The Perils of False Brethren, in Church, and State, the threat to the church from Catholics was dealt with in three minutes; the rest of the one-and-a-half-hour sermon was an attack on Nonconformists and the “false brethren” who aided them in menacing church and state.

Sacheverell’s trial lasted from 27 February to 21 March 1710 and the verdict was that he should be suspended for three years and that the two sermons should be burnt at the Royal Exchange. This was the decree of the state, and it had the effect of making him a martyr in the eyes of the populace and (along with heavy taxes on Londoners) bringing about the first Sacheverell riots that year in London and the rest of the country, which included attacks on Presbyterian and other Dissenter places of worship, with some being burned down. The rioting in turn led to the downfall of the government ministry later that year and the passing of the Riot Act in 1714.

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Sacheverell

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