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Tag: Brentford

Old England and the Brave New World

by 5ocietyx

New England Banksy

New England public house, Brentford. Pissing Policeman by the elusive Banksy

The area around Brentford Docks used to be known as ‘Old England’. It has seen 3 battles involving colourful historical characters such as Julius Caesar and King Canute.

In more recent times, Banksy has been fond of using the west London town as a canvas for his artistic statements. J.M.W. Turner once lived in Brentford behind the High Street.

Its not a race by Banksy, Brentford

‘Its not a race’ by the elusive Banksy, Brentford

Lucozade sign, Brentford

Lucozade sign, Brentford

Recently, the iconic Lucozade sign has returned, not to the exact same spot as the original building has been knocked down but it looks very similar to what it did before. It was once suggested that the lights would be stored in Gunnersbury Park museum, the former country pile of N.M. Rothschild, and a modernized version would be installed instead. On this occasion however, the Kingston Zodiac, a vast holographic star-temple embedded into the landscape of west London and the outskirts of Surrey, decided to keep the legacy-code intact and just drag and drop it to a nearby memory address space of The Matrix.

Does the mythical return of this local landmark and much-loved treasure transcend not only advertising but art itself?

The eternally pouring magic bottle that ‘replaces lost energy’ almost takes on grail-like dimensions considering its proximity to Osterley Park, the sign of Aquarius as well as the grail in the Kingston Zodiac.

But it is the synchro-mystical connection to Orwell’s 1984, set in London, that intrigues us the most especially as his once tutor at Eton, Aldous Huxley set scenes from Brave New World in Brentford too which we’ll come to next.

‘It struck him that the man’s whole life was playing a part, and that he felt it to be dangerous to drop his assumed personality even for a moment. O’Brien took the decanter by the neck and filled up the glasses with a dark-red liquid. It aroused in Winston dim memories of something seen long ago on a wall or a hoarding — a vast bottle composed of electric lights which seemed to move up and down and pour its contents into a glass. Seen from the top the stuff looked almost black, but in the decanter it gleamed like a ruby. It had a sour-sweet smell. He saw Julia pick up her glass and sniff at it with frank curiosity.’

‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’, George Orwell

Sky Television Studios, Sion Hill, Brentford

Sky Television Studios, Syon Hill, Brentford

‘On their way back to London they stopped at the Television Corporation’s factory at Brentford.’

Brave New World’, Aldous Huxley

There is a rumour that the currently vacant Gillette building will be turned into a television studio, presumably by Sky who are based a stone’s throw away. West London and the outskirts have a rich cinematic and televisual history what with studios in Ealing, Twickenham, Isleworth, Brentford, Teddington, Pinewood, Wood Lane, White City, Chiswick and Shepperton.

Neither the “vast bottle composed of electric lights which seemed to move up and down and pour its contents into a glass” or the “Television Corporation’s factory at Brentford” existed when the Dystopian duo of English literature wrote their works.

Both are seen as prophets of the modern times, particularly Orwell. Huxley is suspected by some as laying out the blue-print rather than a warning of the eugenics based social-engineering the elites had planned that as an insider and a Huxley he was privy to. Doubts have also been raised about Orwell’s motives too considering his tutelage at Eton by Huxley.

We don’t tend to go along with these conspiracy theories regarding Orwell and the fact that Eric Blair died in near poverty on a remote Scottish island while he laboured to finish his seminal timeless classic on totalitarianism is an indication of his intention.

He was a patriotic socialist who saw the Loony Left and their mind-controlling speech-codes that inverted reality and stunted free thought a mile away.  His pen-name of George also hints strongly towards England’s patron saint whose origin goes back thousands of years.

In our view Orwell loved England and its people as well as those of other nations. He got shot in the throat fighting in the Spanish Civil War. He was a war correspondent for the BBC chronicling Nazi and Soviet atrocities. He held the British Empire to account. By way of his novel 1984 he gave the world the key to understanding and neutralizing fascism and defeating the New World Order. His antidote is embedded in the culture and language of the English-speaking peoples and has been translated into dozens of other languages. It essentially boils down to knowing your enemy.

Orwell and Huxley were not the only famous writers to be attracted to Brentford. Everyone from Milton to Shakespeare and Dickens to Johnson, have been fascinated by the area basing some of the most famous works in English literature in the town and immediate surrounds.

Agatha Christie once lived in Brentford and in more recent times ’50 Shades of Grey’ author  E.L James lived in Clifden Road.

But as we shall discuss in subsequent posts, Brentford holds a special place in the Canon of English literature that far surpasses the fame of James’ ‘mummy-porn’ genre.

Brentford

Brentford

Golden Mile, Brentford

Golden Mile, Brentford

Brentford monument

Brentford monument

Brentford monument

Brentford monument

Brentford monument

Brentford monument

New England public house

New England public house

Brent Lea, Brentford

Brent Lea, Brentford

Brent Lea Lavatories, Brentford

Brent Lea Lavatories, Brentford

Cricket on Kew Green

Cricket on Kew Green

The Bennu bird of Brentford and the Phoenix of Osterley

by 5ocietyx

Heron-Brentford

Heron in Brentford Docks are thriving

As we trekked the zodiac, making pilgrimage up Wood Lane towards the sign of Aquarius, Osterley Park, we almost were diverted off course upon discovering a magical secret en-trance hidden within the roadside thicket but chose not to let our curiosity side-track us from the main task which was to reach the holy grail of western folklore.

The-Wycome-House-entrance

Mysterious secret en-trance in Wood Lane, Osterley

As the crow flies, Osterley Park is a mile or so from the edge of Brentford. Pheasants have been spotted in the Osterley area by the 5ociety’s ornithological expeditionary parties in the past and are known to inhabit Osterley Park and the surrounds.

golden-pheasant-osterley-menagerie

A male gold pheasant: a bird standing on a mossy rock in profile to right, with a crest and a long dappled tail; plate for ‘Birds … from the Menagerie at Osterley Park’ (1794)

Bald-eagle-Osterley-Aviary

An illustration of a Bald Eagle in the “Portraits of Rare and Curious Birds and their Descriptions from the Menagery of Osterley Park” by William Hayes and Family, 1794.

What is considered to be the nearest conventional bird to the phoenix – the gold pheasant was once caged in the Menagerie of Osterley along with a bald eagle that the U.S.A equates with the phoenix.

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

As previously mentioned in the Osterley Park: Holy Grail post, twin stone eagles guard the en-trance steps that lead to Osterley House. The Eagle and the Phoenix are known to be synonymous particularly in Craft Freemasonry.

Bennu Bird

Bennu Bird

The Bennu, a heron,  is an ancient Egyptian deity linked with the sun, creation, and rebirth. It may have been the inspiration for the phoenix in Greek mythology.

If you include the previously discussed Peacocks of Kew Gardens, Falcon of Osterley and Griffin of Brentford there are actually 6 types of bird that we have now identified on our travels as being associated with the local area of Brentford and Osterley that have connections to the phoenix.  (Seven if you include the chemtrail guzzling Thunderbirds soaring overhead taking on the New World Order’s squadron of metal birds as they leave Heathrow in pitched battle for air superiority.)

This would make sense as according to the Godmother of Synchromysticism, Mary Caine, Osterley Park itself is a giant bird. Or more pertinently the Aquarian phoenix of the grail legend and Chaldean zodiac.

This is the ‘herstory’ of the twelve knights of the round table or landscape zodiac of yore that all religions originate from.

The peacock, the heron, the falcon, the griffin and the pheasant are all biological signatures that testify to the zodiac. Although eagles no longer reside in the area, they are remembered in the stone statues.

As the phoenix symbolism would suggest, Brentford is forever changing. New structures are constantly being built with the present day being no exception with a hive of activity currently underway to regenerate the town.

Osterley is quieter, its village feel defies development by town planning laws and local consent as well as the will of the zodiac which inspired Francis Childs to wall off the grounds in the first place in what was seen at the time as an elitist statement of separation that someone like Anglo-Aussie eccentric Trenton Oldfield would see as divisively fencing something in. But with the sprawl of London an unimaginable possibility at the time the decision almost certainly saved this mystical metropolitan oasis from being concreted over with yet more residential properties and the grail would have been lost forever in the concrete forests of suburbia.

Yet the grail of Osterley Park, like Brentford, and as with the seasons is always changing, continually providing rejuvenating qualities yet forever remaining the same.

The Osterley Park Aviary was like a microcosm of the local eco-system that is home to a wide variety of ornithological species. But the more exotic winged creatures could not be caged.

The peacocks of Kew Gardens have the run of the place, although they were turfed out of Syon Park due to their squawking. Herons have been in London longer than modern man and the elusive griffin defies capture with implausible ease drifting into the folklore of the town, hidden in plain view in the very fabric of Brentford discernible to those who read the signs.

peacock-alley-logo

Peacock Alley, Syon Park, Brentford

The opulent Peacock Alley Bar remembers the lost peacocks of Syon.

The Flying Griffin of Brentford

by 5ocietyx

The Brentford Griffin

Artist’s impression of the Griffin of Brentford

The Griffin was a part of Brentford’s heritage long before the first modern sightings of a real-life Griffin were reported in the 1980s.

Brentford Football Club’s ground is called Griffin Park. A pub on a corner of the stadium is called The Griffin. They serve Fuller’s Ale, brewed in bordering Chiswick. Fuller’s logo features a griffin.

The Green Dragon estate is a famous landmark of the town (seen in the background in the photo above). Griffin Court is situated just off the High Street.

The legend of the Griffin runs throughout the town, embedded in the street names, estates, football team, pubs and local folklore.

It transpires that there is historical evidence of a family of griffins who lived on Brentford Eyot. So the story goes, King Charles II bought the first one here as a present for his mistress, Nell Gwynn.  Neil A from the Beasts of London website picks up the tale

“During the middle of 1984, a Kevin Chippendale was strolling along Braemar Road, when he observed a strange creature in the skies near the Green Dragon apartments, rather coincidentally! He claimed that the beast resembled a dog but with wings and a beak.

Mr Chippendale saw the creature again in the February of 1985 and said that the apparition bore some resemblance to the creature painted on the sign of the Griffin Public House.

A friend of Kevin’s, an Angela Keyhoe also claimed to have seen the flying monster. She was on a bus journey when she saw it sitting on the gasometer next to the Waterman’s Art Centre. She said it resembled a giant black bird. Several passengers on the bus apparently saw the creature, and so did psychologist John Olssen, one morning whilst he was jogging near to the Thames. Sightings seem to escalate, and the legend was featured in the press and also on The Six O’ Clock News.

Nell Gwynn, who had a house in the Butts at Brentford. One day the griffin was playing on the banks of the River Brent, which flows past the Butts, and fell in. The hapless creature was washed down the Brent into the Thames, finally being washed up on Brentford Eyot. As it was assumed to have been killed, it was left alone and was able to live on the Eyot for many years – griffins having a lifespan of centuries.

Then Sir Joseph Banks brought back a griffin from a Pacific island where he had been with Captain Cook. This griffin was originally housed in the Pagoda in Kew Gardens, which is on the opposite bank of the Thames from Brentford Eyot where it found a mate awaiting it.

There was soon a whole colony of griffins and they spread out from the Eyot all over the town of Brentford, where they can still be seen to this day, if you look closely enough.

This story has stayed with me…it is a nice bit of Brentford mythology.”

The Brentford Griffin

Artist’s impression of the Brentford Griffin

It could be convincingly argued that it is this very connection that inspired this obvious hoax in an attempt to give the story credibility. Maybe. But whoever did so did their research or were lucky to have such a back-story to put meat on the bones of their reports.

Whilst remaining alert for pranksters, trolls and hoaxers that dwell within T’Hinternets, we are open-minded as to the alleged sighting of the elusive Griffin of Brentford.  We recognise the symbolism in the town and comprehend its importance, we have researched the history and we are well aware there are more things in this world than is thought possible in the seemingly humdrum existence of suburbia. This includes griffins, dragons, giants, genies, thunderbirds, wizards, centaurs, fawns, fairies, yeti, nessie, pixies, crypto-terrestrials, unicorns* and all the other characters of mythology and folklore.

In fact, we would go so far as to say that virtually every mythological creature is or was a real creature once upon a time. Many of which may still exist in habitats off-limits to human exploration or stumbled across by a fortunate or unfortunate few intrepid or accidental tourists whose Fortean stories are filed away under cranks and hoaxes because despite recent inventions such as the GPS and applications such as Google Earth and Ocean we should be reminded that mankind has yet to explore the depths of the oceans, the subterranean realms and impenetrable mountain ranges and rain-forests.

Who knows, perhaps some may even be a lot closer to home, obscured by our own disbelief systems and social constructs. We see what we believe.

*We are still undecided as to whether unicorns were/are real or 100% mythological.

Related Posts
The Peacocks of Kew Gardens

Sources:
http://beastsoflondon.blogspot.co.uk/2007/04/brentford-griffin.html
http://www.thelondonword.com/2008/10/something-weird-this-way-comes/

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