Society X

the Great Universe

Tag: Cornwall

The lost gardens of Heligan

by 5ocietyx

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Heligan (“The Willows” in Cornish) is first mentioned in the twelfth century. At that time it appears to have been part of an estate owned by the Arundell family. At some point later it transferred to the Hill family who sold the entire estate to Sampson Tremayne who, like his brother John, had moved from Devon in the mid C l6th. From this point there were two main branches of the family, the Devonian branch and the Cornish. The Devon branch were based at the magnificent Sydenham house near Lewdown and at Collacombe near Lamerton. Source

The ‘giants’ of Heligan resonate with Northumberlandia, the recently completed earth sculpture of a goddess.

The lost gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Lost Gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Sleeping Mud-maid, Lost Gardens of Heligan

Sleeping Mud-maid, Lost Gardens of Heligan

Sleeping Mud-maid, Lost Gardens of Heligan

Sleeping Mud-maid, Lost Gardens of Heligan

http://heligan.com

Mên-an-Tol

by 5ocietyx

Mên an Tol

Mên an Tol – lol

The name literally means the ‘hole stone’ and along with two upright granite stones either side appears to form a three dimensional lol. The circular stone is in the shape of a torus. This is the shape of a human embryo in its early stages and the shape many scientists use to model the universe.

The stones were known for their healing properties and fertility.

On a full moon if a woman passes through the stone 7 times backwards she increases her chances of becoming pregnant

Likewise if a child with rickets passed through naked 9 times he will be cured.

The circular stone aligns exactly with the centre stone at Boscawen-Un and the church at nearby St Buryan. While this may conceivably be coincidental, the precision of the alignment suggests an intentional positioning of the structures in relation to each other.

Mên an Tol

Mên an Tol – lol

Source: Wikipedia

The Giant of St Michael’s Mount

by 5ocietyx

st_michaels_mount_daybreak

Cornish folklore tells the story of how in the time of King Arthur a fearsome giant by the name Cormoran built St Michael’s Mount and lived in a cave there from where he would launch raids into Penwith and the Cornish mainland.

A local lad by the name of Jack rowed to the mount and dug a pit before luring the giant into it. He did this by blowing a horn at sunrise when the giant was asleep which woke him up. He staggered out and blinded by sunlight fell into the pit.

Cormoran

Jack and the locals mocked the trapped giant before killing him with a pickaxe.

This became the fairy-tale ‘Jack the Giant Killer’ which still resonates today with a Hollywood production based on the legend due for release next year.

St Michael’s Mount lies on the St Michael line previously discussed here.

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