Society X

the Great Universe

Tag: Latin

Core, Coeur, Cor, Kerd

by 5ocietyx

the core of a human

Core (n.) late 14c., probably from Old French coeur “core of fruit, heart of lettuce,” literally “heart,” from Latin cor “heart,” from PIE root *kerd- “heart”.

taken from – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=core&allowed_in_frame=0

Note the Proto-Indo-European root of the word ‘core’ is ultimately ‘kerd’. This is also the root of the Germanic-origin English word ‘heart’.

Etymology of the word ‘Vatican’

by 5ocietyx

Druids Ovates

The English-Latin noun vates /ˈveɪtiːz/ is a term for a prophet, following the Latin term. It is the origin of the English term ovate for an Irish bard.

In pagan Rome the vates resided on the Vatican Hill, the Hill of the Vatii. Indeed, the Vatican Hill takes it name from the Latin word Vaticanus, a vaticiniis ferendis, in allusion to the oracles, or Vaticinia, which were anciently delivered on the Vatican Hill.

Druids, Vates (or Ovates) and Bards represented the three classes of Celtic priesthood, according to the Ancient Greek writers. Druids played the important role in the Celtic society dealing with magic, religious rites, worship and sacrifices, judicial procedures, literature and language, philosophy, astronomy and medicine. Vates had the role of seers, prophets and performed sacrifices, while Bards were poets and musicians who collected oral traditions, serving to preserve history and spread the fame of brave warriors and kings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vates
http://www.memoryofstones.eu/2/druids_vates_bards_333035.html

Fire – etymology

by 5ocietyx

fire (n.) Look up fire at Dictionary.comO.E. fyr, from P.Gmc. *fuir (cf. O.S., O.Fris. fiur, O.N. fürr, M.Du., Du. vuur, O.H.G. fiur, Ger. Feuer), from PIE *perjos, from root *paewr- (cf. Armenian hur “fire, torch,” Czech pyr “hot ashes,” Gk. pyr, Umbrian pir, Skt. pu, Hittite pahhur “fire”). Current spelling is attested as early as 1200, but did not fully displace M.E. fier(preserved in fiery) until c.1600.

PIE apparently had two roots for fire: *paewr- and *egni- (cf. L. ignis). The former was “inanimate,” referring to fire as a substance, and the latter was “animate,” referring to it as a living force (see water).

taken from –

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=fire&searchmode=none

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