Society X

the Great Universe

Tag: Osterley Park

The Lucozade sign, Brentford, 1984 and the Holy Grail

by 5ocietyx

lucozade-ad-Brentford

Recently, the iconic Art Deco Lucozade sign has returned to Brentford, not to the exact same spot as the original building has been demolished but it looks very much like it did before. It was once suggested that the lights would be stored in Gunnersbury Park museum and a modernised updated version would be installed instead. On this occasion the Kingston Zodiac decided to keep the legacy code intact and just drag and drop it to a nearby memory address space.

Best viewed at night when the lights are more visible, it serves as an unofficial marker that says you will soon be entering London proper (depending on congestion on the A4).

The eternally pouring magic bottle that ‘replaces lost energy’ into a glass almost takes on grail-like dimensions considering its proximity to Osterley Park, the sign of Aquarius as well as the holy grail of the Kingston Zodiac.

But it is the synchromystical connection to Orwell’s 1984, set in London, that intrigues us the most, especially as his once tutor at Eton, Aldous Huxley set scenes from Brave New World in Brentford too which we’ll come to next in a separate post.

Although the Lucozade sign had yet to be built when Eric Blair finished his seminal masterpiece, we feel in synchromystical terms linear time-frames become somewhat irrelevant when tapping into the timeless realms of mysticism as we sense Orwell had knowingly or unknowingly done. Particularly so with regards to 1984 where dates and history had been confused by The Party.

‘It struck him that the man’s whole life was playing a part, and that he felt it to be dangerous to drop his assumed personality even for a moment. O’Brien took the decanter by the neck and filled up the glasses with a dark-red liquid. It aroused in Winston dim memories of something seen long ago on a wall or a hoarding — a vast bottle composed of electric lights which seemed to move up and down and pour its contents into a glass. Seen from the top the stuff looked almost black, but in the decanter it gleamed like a ruby. It had a sour-sweet smell. He saw Julia pick up her glass and sniff at it with frank curiosity.’

Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell

The Bennu bird of Brentford and the Phoenix of Osterley

by 5ocietyx

Heron-Brentford

Heron in Brentford Docks are thriving

As we trekked the zodiac, making pilgrimage up Wood Lane towards the sign of Aquarius, Osterley Park, we almost were diverted off course upon discovering a magical secret en-trance hidden within the roadside thicket but chose not to let our curiosity side-track us from the main task which was to reach the holy grail of western folklore.

The-Wycome-House-entrance

Mysterious secret en-trance in Wood Lane, Osterley

As the crow flies, Osterley Park is a mile or so from the edge of Brentford. Pheasants have been spotted in the Osterley area by the 5ociety’s ornithological expeditionary parties in the past and are known to inhabit Osterley Park and the surrounds.

golden-pheasant-osterley-menagerie

A male gold pheasant: a bird standing on a mossy rock in profile to right, with a crest and a long dappled tail; plate for ‘Birds … from the Menagerie at Osterley Park’ (1794)

Bald-eagle-Osterley-Aviary

An illustration of a Bald Eagle in the “Portraits of Rare and Curious Birds and their Descriptions from the Menagery of Osterley Park” by William Hayes and Family, 1794.

What is considered to be the nearest conventional bird to the phoenix – the gold pheasant was once caged in the Menagerie of Osterley along with a bald eagle that the U.S.A equates with the phoenix.

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

As previously mentioned in the Osterley Park: Holy Grail post, twin stone eagles guard the en-trance steps that lead to Osterley House. The Eagle and the Phoenix are known to be synonymous particularly in Craft Freemasonry.

Bennu Bird

Bennu Bird

The Bennu, a heron,  is an ancient Egyptian deity linked with the sun, creation, and rebirth. It may have been the inspiration for the phoenix in Greek mythology.

If you include the previously discussed Peacocks of Kew Gardens, Falcon of Osterley and Griffin of Brentford there are actually 6 types of bird that we have now identified on our travels as being associated with the local area of Brentford and Osterley that have connections to the phoenix.  (Seven if you include the chemtrail guzzling Thunderbirds soaring overhead taking on the New World Order’s squadron of metal birds as they leave Heathrow in pitched battle for air superiority.)

This would make sense as according to the Godmother of Synchromysticism, Mary Caine, Osterley Park itself is a giant bird. Or more pertinently the Aquarian phoenix of the grail legend and Chaldean zodiac.

This is the ‘herstory’ of the twelve knights of the round table or landscape zodiac of yore that all religions originate from.

The peacock, the heron, the falcon, the griffin and the pheasant are all biological signatures that testify to the zodiac. Although eagles no longer reside in the area, they are remembered in the stone statues.

As the phoenix symbolism would suggest, Brentford is forever changing. New structures are constantly being built with the present day being no exception with a hive of activity currently underway to regenerate the town.

Osterley is quieter, its village feel defies development by town planning laws and local consent as well as the will of the zodiac which inspired Francis Childs to wall off the grounds in the first place in what was seen at the time as an elitist statement of separation that someone like Anglo-Aussie eccentric Trenton Oldfield would see as divisively fencing something in. But with the sprawl of London an unimaginable possibility at the time the decision almost certainly saved this mystical metropolitan oasis from being concreted over with yet more residential properties and the grail would have been lost forever in the concrete forests of suburbia.

Yet the grail of Osterley Park, like Brentford, and as with the seasons is always changing, continually providing rejuvenating qualities yet forever remaining the same.

The Osterley Park Aviary was like a microcosm of the local eco-system that is home to a wide variety of ornithological species. But the more exotic winged creatures could not be caged.

The peacocks of Kew Gardens have the run of the place, although they were turfed out of Syon Park due to their squawking. Herons have been in London longer than modern man and the elusive griffin defies capture with implausible ease drifting into the folklore of the town, hidden in plain view in the very fabric of Brentford discernible to those who read the signs.

peacock-alley-logo

Peacock Alley, Syon Park, Brentford

The opulent Peacock Alley Bar remembers the lost peacocks of Syon.

Osterley Park: The Holy Grail

by 5ocietyx

Osterley Park lake

Osterley Park lake

According to Mary Caine’s Kingston Zodiac, Osterley Park forms the sign of Aquarius equating it with the phoenix-eagle, or waterpot, cauldron or grail.

“The earliest Chaldean sign for Aquarius was simply a water-pot. But crested bird, Cauldron and Grail all symbolise much the same idea; rebirth on a higher octave. Crested eagles, phoenixes and even peacocks sometimes appeared on Roman and early Christian tombstones; the crest signifying where the spirit escaped from the body. Just as the old or dead were plunged into the legendary cauldron and were revived, so the phoenix rose from its own ashes with the new year.”

Map of Osterley overlay on Aquarius of the Kingston Zodiac

Map of Osterley overlay on Aquarius of the Kingston Zodiac

As you enter the park through its front gates and walk up the tree-lined Alameda you instantly become aware of its rejuvenating qualities and peacefulness. On a summer’s day a breeze whistles through the towering row of trees before you reach the lake which forms the phoenix’s left leg.

A royal legend that adds intrigue to the zodiac theory is the story of how Edward III gave Osterley to a man called Fawkener on condition that he rode round it annually with a falcon on his wrist. This appears to be an example of nominative determinism.

Osterley Park crop field

Osterley Park crop field

Caine also links ‘Kew Garden’s heaven‘ with the ‘man-made hell of Brentford’ and ‘Syon House’s heavenly gates‘ with Osterley’s Easter Resurrection.

‘Three adjacent signs here stamp Man’s evolutionary journey on the landscape – from primal innocence through bitter experience to final illumination.’

The 5ociety concurs with Caine’s theory on the origin of the place-name ‘Oster-ley’ associating it with the goddess Ostara as well as the Great West ley-line that becomes the ‘A30 ley-line’. The Piccadilly line runs through Osterley and according to Alfred Watkins and a book called London’s Ley Lines – Pathways of Enlightenment’ is itself a ley-line that runs parallel to the Great West Road at this juncture.

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Two eagles stand guard over the en-trance to Osterley House and an aviary once existed nearby in the park that housed among other creatures, the gold pheasant and bald eagle that are both associated with the phoenix.

Horace Walpole of Strawberry Hill remarked on Osterley House

“Oh, the palace of palaces! And yet a palace sans crown, sans coronet, but such expense! Such taste! Such profusion! The old house I have often seen, which was built by Sir Thomas Gresham; but it is so improved and enriched that all the Percies and Seymores of Syon must die with envy.”

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

He was less enamoured with the park itself labelling it ‘the ugliest spot in the universe’. Anyone who visits Osterley Park today will probably think the opposite especially if they venture into the gardens to the rear of the house which contain a Robert Adams Orangery and Temple of Pan and is one of the most idyllic corners of England but sadly the National Trust has in recent years placed a paywall at its en-trance.  Among its other natural wonders are a sacred grove of rhododendrons, a walled garden and mature cedars.

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

Nevertheless, the common man, a theme of Aquarius, can still wander freely along the lake and through another copse of mature cedars beside Osterley House adorned by its dreamy wisteria like a jewelled necklace and can still enter the gardens for a few pounds.

If you are early enough and fortunate you can see the sight of a swan using the lake as a runway before taking flight signifying the freedom and majesty the Holy Grail of Osterley heralds for one and all.

Swan, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha

Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha, the largest Sikh temple in Europe viewed from Osterley Park

St Mary's church from Osterley Park

St Mary’s church steeple from Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

sacred rhododendron grove Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

golden lake, Osterley Park

golden lake, Osterley Park

Robert-Adams-Osterley-Park1

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Swan, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adam Orangery, Osterley Park

Stone eagle looks to the north guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle looks to the north guarding Osterley House

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Robert Adams Orangery, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Lake, Osterley Park

Lake, Osterley Park

Temple of Pan-Osterley Park

Temple of Pan, Osterley Park

Crop field-Osterley Park

Crop field, Osterley Park

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