Society X

the Great Universe

Tag: Peacock

The Bennu bird of Brentford and the Phoenix of Osterley

by 5ocietyx

Heron-Brentford

Heron in Brentford Docks are thriving

As we trekked the zodiac, making pilgrimage up Wood Lane towards the sign of Aquarius, Osterley Park, we almost were diverted off course upon discovering a magical secret en-trance hidden within the roadside thicket but chose not to let our curiosity side-track us from the main task which was to reach the holy grail of western folklore.

The-Wycome-House-entrance

Mysterious secret en-trance in Wood Lane, Osterley

As the crow flies, Osterley Park is a mile or so from the edge of Brentford. Pheasants have been spotted in the Osterley area by the 5ociety’s ornithological expeditionary parties in the past and are known to inhabit Osterley Park and the surrounds.

golden-pheasant-osterley-menagerie

A male gold pheasant: a bird standing on a mossy rock in profile to right, with a crest and a long dappled tail; plate for ‘Birds … from the Menagerie at Osterley Park’ (1794)

Bald-eagle-Osterley-Aviary

An illustration of a Bald Eagle in the “Portraits of Rare and Curious Birds and their Descriptions from the Menagery of Osterley Park” by William Hayes and Family, 1794.

What is considered to be the nearest conventional bird to the phoenix – the gold pheasant was once caged in the Menagerie of Osterley along with a bald eagle that the U.S.A equates with the phoenix.

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

Stone eagle guarding Osterley House

As previously mentioned in the Osterley Park: Holy Grail post, twin stone eagles guard the en-trance steps that lead to Osterley House. The Eagle and the Phoenix are known to be synonymous particularly in Craft Freemasonry.

Bennu Bird

Bennu Bird

The Bennu, a heron,  is an ancient Egyptian deity linked with the sun, creation, and rebirth. It may have been the inspiration for the phoenix in Greek mythology.

If you include the previously discussed Peacocks of Kew Gardens, Falcon of Osterley and Griffin of Brentford there are actually 6 types of bird that we have now identified on our travels as being associated with the local area of Brentford and Osterley that have connections to the phoenix.  (Seven if you include the chemtrail guzzling Thunderbirds soaring overhead taking on the New World Order’s squadron of metal birds as they leave Heathrow in pitched battle for air superiority.)

This would make sense as according to the Godmother of Synchromysticism, Mary Caine, Osterley Park itself is a giant bird. Or more pertinently the Aquarian phoenix of the grail legend and Chaldean zodiac.

This is the ‘herstory’ of the twelve knights of the round table or landscape zodiac of yore that all religions originate from.

The peacock, the heron, the falcon, the griffin and the pheasant are all biological signatures that testify to the zodiac. Although eagles no longer reside in the area, they are remembered in the stone statues.

As the phoenix symbolism would suggest, Brentford is forever changing. New structures are constantly being built with the present day being no exception with a hive of activity currently underway to regenerate the town.

Osterley is quieter, its village feel defies development by town planning laws and local consent as well as the will of the zodiac which inspired Francis Childs to wall off the grounds in the first place in what was seen at the time as an elitist statement of separation that someone like Anglo-Aussie eccentric Trenton Oldfield would see as divisively fencing something in. But with the sprawl of London an unimaginable possibility at the time the decision almost certainly saved this mystical metropolitan oasis from being concreted over with yet more residential properties and the grail would have been lost forever in the concrete forests of suburbia.

Yet the grail of Osterley Park, like Brentford, and as with the seasons is always changing, continually providing rejuvenating qualities yet forever remaining the same.

The Osterley Park Aviary was like a microcosm of the local eco-system that is home to a wide variety of ornithological species. But the more exotic winged creatures could not be caged.

The peacocks of Kew Gardens have the run of the place, although they were turfed out of Syon Park due to their squawking. Herons have been in London longer than modern man and the elusive griffin defies capture with implausible ease drifting into the folklore of the town, hidden in plain view in the very fabric of Brentford discernible to those who read the signs.

peacock-alley-logo

Peacock Alley, Syon Park, Brentford

The opulent Peacock Alley Bar remembers the lost peacocks of Syon.

The Peacocks of Kew Gardens

by 5ocietyx

Video taken April 2013 by 5ocietyx @ Kew Gardens

In modern times, peacocks gained a bad rep for being squawking show-offs strutting around like they were royalty with a trailing plumage longer than Princess Diana’s wedding gown.

But this wasn’t always the case. Throughout history and in various traditions, the peacock was known as a mystical bird with phoenix-like attributes and associated with royalty, rejuvenation, spirititual awakening and immortality.

If nature had not created them and a fiction writer were to invent a fantastical creature along the lines of a peacock the reader would be required to suspend disbelief such is their seemingly implausible design.

Yet the 5ociety managed to catch up with one of these magnificent birds recently in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and captured it displaying.

Is our current perception of the peacock a modern symbol of how we as humans have been intentionally prevented from knowing our true nature and should we look again to the proud peacock and learn from it how to display our beauty, integrity and true colours of who we really are?

Other qualities possessed by the peacock include vision, guidance, holiness, protection, refinement, incorruptability,  and watchfulness.

Video taken April 2013 by 5ocietyx

Yet the peacocks of Kew are not the only ‘mythical’ birds with a bad rep to grace royal Brentford…

Avia Venefica provides a definitive explanation of the symbolism of the peacock:

In Greco-Roman mythology the Peacock is identified with Hera (Juno) who created the Peacock from Argus whose hundred eyes (seen on the tail feathers of the Peacock) symbolize the vault of heaven and the “eyes” of the stars.

In Hinduism the Peacock is associated with Lakshmi who is a deity representing benevolence, patience, kindness, compassion and good luck.

Similar to Lakshmi, the Peacock is associated with Kwan-yin in Asian spirituality. Kwan-yin (or Quan Yin) is also an emblem of love, compassionate watchfulness, good-will, nurturing, and kind-heartedness. Legend tells us she chose to remain a mortal even though she could be immortal because she wished to stay behind and aid humanity in their spiritual evolution.

In Babylonia and Persia the Peacock is seen as a guardian to royalty, and is often seen in engravings upon the thrones of royalty.

In Christianity the Peacock symbolism represents the “all-seeing” church, along with the holiness and sanctity associated with it. Additionally, the Peacock represents resurrection, renewal and immortality within the spiritual teachings of Christianity.

Themes of renewal are also linked to alchemical traditions to, as many schools of thought compare the resurrecting phoenix to the modern-day Peacock.

Source: http://www.whats-your-sign.com/peacock-symbolism.html

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