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Tag: tory riots

The Sacherevell Riots, 1710

by 5ocietyx

Interesting riot situation in which circumstances are not unlike those of present day Britain.

 

The Sacheverell riots were a series of outbreaks of public disorder, which spread across England during the spring, summer and autumn of 1710 in which supporters of the Tories attacked Dissenters’, particularlyPresbyterians’ homes and meeting-houses, whose congregations tended to support the Whigs… The Sacheverell and Rebellion riots are regarded as the most serious instances of public disorder of the eighteenth century.

The riots reflected the dissatisfaction of many Anglicans to the toleration of an increasing number ofIndependent, Baptist, and Presbyterian chapels, which diminished the apparent authority of the Church of England; and were a reaction to perceived grievances against the Whig government, in regard to high taxation resulting from the War of the Spanish Succession, the recent sudden influx of some 10,000 Calvinist refugees from Germany,[3] and the growth of the merchant classes, the so-called “monied interest”.[2]

Rioting broke out in London. On the evening of March 1, protestors attacked an elegant Presbyterian meeting-house in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, built only five years before. They smashed the windows, stripped the tiles from the roof and ripped out its interior wooden fittings, which they made into a bonfire. The crowd then marauded through much of the West End of London chanting “High Church and Sacheverell” .[2]

It spread across the country, notably in Wrexham,[5] Barnstaple and Gainsborough, where Presbyterian meeting-houses were attacked, with many being burnt to the ground. The Sacheverell riots and further disturbances in 1714 and 1715, led to the passing of the Riot Act.[6]

taken from –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacheverell_riots

Decisive moments in British history: The Coronation riots, 1714

by 5ocietyx

The coronation riots of October 1714 were a series of riots in southern and western England in protest against the coronation of the first Hanoverian king of Britain, George I.

On 20 October George was crowned at Westminster Abbey but when loyalists celebrated the coronation they were disrupted by rioters in over twenty towns in the south and west of England.[1] The rioters were supporters of High Church and Sacheverellite notions.[1] The Tory aristocrats and gentry absented themselves from the coronation and in some towns they arrived with their supporters to disrupt the Hanoverian proceedings.[2]

The celebrations of the coronation—balls, bonfires and drinking in taverns—were attacked by rioters who sacked their properties and assaulted the celebrants.

The general election of 1715, which was also accompanied by riots, produced a Whig majority in the House of Commons. In response to these riots, the new Whig majority passed the Riot Act to put down disturbances like these.

Eleven days after the riots, Henry Sacheverell published an open letter:

The Dissenters & their Friends have foolishly Endeavour’d to raise a Disturbance throughout the whole Kingdom by Trying in most Great Towns, on the Coronation Day to Burn Me in Effigie, to Inodiate my Person & Cause with the Populace: But if this Silly Stratagem has produc’d a quite Contrary Effect, & turn’s upon the First Authors, & aggressors, and the People have Express’d their Resentment in any Culpable way, I hope it is not to be laid to my Charge, whose Name…they make Use of as the Shibboleth of the Party.[9]

taken from  –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronation_riots

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